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NEA-Supported Bills on NCLB for the 112th Congress

NEA supports a number of bills in the new Congress to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act/No Child Left Behind (ESEA/NCLB).

NEA supports the following 195 bills

Senate


The Fast Track to College Act of 2011 (S. 154) (111th S. 627), introduced by Senator Kohl (D-WI) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award matching six-year grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) that partner with institutions of higher education (IHEs) to establish or support dual enrollment programs, such as early college high schools, that allow high school students to earn credit simultaneously toward a high school diploma and a postsecondary degree or certificate. The Act would also authorize the Secretary to award matching five-year grants to states to: (1) plan and implement statewide strategies to make dual enrollment programs more accessible to students who are underrepresented in postsecondary education; (2) provide technical assistance to dual enrollment programs; and (3) engage in outreach, assessment, and teacher training activities designed to strengthen such programs. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 154.

The Innovate America Act (S. 239), introduced by Senator Klobuchar (D-MN) would require the Secretary of Education to award grants, on a competitive basis, to State educational agencies to enable LEAs to establish, maintain or expand science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) secondary schools. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 239.

The No Child Left Behind Flexibility and Improvements Act (S. 280) (111th S. 3316), introduced by Senator Collins (R-ME) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to revise requirements relating to annual yearly progress (AYP) of students and schools, statewide and local accountability systems, special education, limited English proficiency students, funding levels and academic assessment deferrals, highly qualified teachers, and reading activities. The bill would authorize the Secretary of Education to modify an AYP timeline and allow states to use: (1) additional types of statewide models and systems for measuring all students' progress and (2) alternative assessments, designated by their individualized education program plan teams, for students with disabilities. The bill would give states an option to include as limited English proficiency students, until they complete secondary school, those formerly in such subgroup who have subsequently acquired English proficiency. The bill would permit use of local assessments in measuring AYP and increase tthe levels of ESEA funding which must be reached before states are not allowed certain deferrals of academic assessments. The bill would add options for deeming teachers of multiple academic subjects as highly qualified, and for general social studies certification. The bill would reauthorize the Reading First and Early Reading First programs through FY2017. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 280.

Note: NEA supports reauthorizing the Reading First program until it is replaced by provisions of the LEARN Act (see 111th Congress - S. 2740).


The Foundations for Success Act of 2011 (S. 294),
introduced by Senator Sanders (I-VT) would require the Secretary of Education, in coordination with the Assistant Secretary of the Administration for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services, to award a 10-year grant to 10 States (and more in subsequent phases), through a competitive grant process, to enable each State to establish and support an Early Care and Education System in order to allow parents to enroll children, ages 6 weeks to kindergarten, in an early care and education program on a full time basis; provide access to an early care and education program that gives each child an opportunity to develop physical, social, and emotional skills; and improve school readiness by contributing to the cognitive development, character skills, and physical development of each child. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 294.

The Promoting Health as Youth Skills In Classrooms And Life Act (S. 392) (111th S. 3683), introduced by Senator Udall (D-NM) would amend the Department of Education Organization Act to establish an Office of Safe and Healthy Students in the Department of Education to assume the responsibilities of the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools and expand such responsibilities to broader health and physical education issues. The bill would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to include health education and physical education in the definition of "core academic subjects." The bill would require each state to determine the most feasible measure for assessing students in health education and physical education, including through adaptive assessments, to measure student knowledge and performance against state standards. The bill would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to, and enter into contracts with, local educational agencies (LEAs), community-based organizations, and nonprofit organizations to initiate, expand, and improve health education programs for students in kindergarten through grade 12, especially in rural areas. The bill authorizes appropriations for FY2012-FY2016 for the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, which provides matching grants to LEAs and community-based organizations to initiate, expand, and improve physical education programs (including after-school programs) for students in kindergarten through grade 12. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 392.

The Developing Innovative Partnerships and Learning Opportunities that Motivate Achievement (DIPLOMA) Act (S. 426) (111th S. 3595), introduced by Senator Sanders (I-VT) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award renewable five year grants to states and, through them, subgrants to local consortia that include a local educational agency (LEA) and other community partners to: (1) ensure the academic, physical, social, emotional, and civic development of disadvantaged youth; and (2) strengthen their families and communities. The bill would require that each state grantee to develop and implement a state child and youth strategy that assesses children's needs and the assets within the state that can be mobilized, coordinated, and integrated to achieve quantifiable progress toward goals that include ensuring that: (1) children are ready for school; (2) students are engaged and achieving in school; (3) students are physically, mentally, socially, and emotionally healthy; (4) schools and neighborhoods are safe and provide a positive climate for learning; (5) families are supportive and engaged in their children's education; (6) students are ready for postsecondary education and 21st Century careers; and (7) students are contributing to their communities. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 426.

The Teaching Geography Is Fundamental Act (S. 434) (see 111th H.R. 1240), introduced by Senator Cochran (R-MS) would improve and expand geographic literacy among kindergarten through grade 12 students in the United States by improving professional development programs for kindergarten through grade 12 teachers offered through institutions of higher education. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 434.

The Effective STEM Teaching and Learning Act of 2011 (S. 463) (111th S. 3883), introduced by Senator Begich (D-AK) would replace the Mathematics and Science Partnership program under Part B of Title II of ESEA with a program providing competitive grants to states to improve preschool through grade 12 education in: (1) mathematics or science, or both; and (2) at the state's discretion, technology or engineering, or both. The bill would require state grantees to use: (1) up to 20% their grant for certain state-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities, including the development, implementation, or improvement of a comprehensive state STEM plan; and (2) the bulk of their grant for competitive subgrants to high-need local educational agencies (LEAs), partnerships between such LEAs and institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations, or educational service agencies proposing to serve such LEAs. The bill would authorize the Secretary of Education to reserve a portion of Title II Part B funds to award competitive, capacity-building grants to states that do not receive a STEM improvement grant under Part B. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 463.

The Supporting State Systems of Early Learning Act (S. 470), introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive, matching Quality Pathways grants to states that demonstrate the greatest progress toward establishing a high-quality system of early learning that includes: (1) state early learning standards; (2) preservice and ongoing training for staff; (3) the systematic review, rating, and monitoring of early learning programs for ameliorative purposes; (4) parental involvement; (5) health, disability, and family support services and referrals for participating children; (6) an early learning data system; and (7) a process for evaluating children's school readiness and ensuring their effective transition to the public school system. The bill would require the grant to be used to further such progress and move more disadvantaged children into higher quality programs. The bill also provides for competitive Development grants to states that were not awarded a Pathways grant, but commit to developing a high-quality system of early learning that includes the components listed above. The bill does require states to establish a process for evaluating school readiness in children that reflects all of the major domains of development, and that (i) is used to guide practice and improve State early learning programs; and (ii) includes multiple measures of school readiness at kindergarten entry, and which shall reflect a sample across the State; however, the bill also states that funds may not be used for any of the following: (1) assessments that provide rewards or sanctions for individual children or teachers; (2) a single assessment used as the primary or sole method for assessing program effectiveness; or 3) evaluating children other than for (A) improving instruction or classroom environment;(B) targeting professional development; (C) determining the need for health, mental health, disability, or family support services;(D) informing the quality improvement process at the State level; (E) program evaluation for the purposes of program improvement and parent information; or (F) research conducted as part of the national evaluation described under section 5 of the bill. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 470.

The Safe Schools Improvement Act of 2011 S. 506 (111th S. 3739), introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA) would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act to require states and LEAs to monitor and enhance requirements, policies, procedures and prevention programs related to bullying and harassment. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 506.

The Achievement Through Prevention Act (S. 541) (111th S. 3733), introduced by Senator Bennet (D-CO) would amend Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to allow states, local educational agencies, and schools to use school improvement funds to implement school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports and early intervening services and coordinate them with similar activities carried out under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The bill would also amend Title I, Part D of the ESEA to require states that receive funds for the education of neglected or delinquent children or youth to use positive behavioral interventions and supports and early intervening services to improve such students' academic performance and reduce their need for discipline. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 541.

The Annual National Classified School Employee of the Year Award Act (S. 547) (111th S. 3645), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award National Classified School Employees of the Year Awards to public school employees within certain occupational specialties who provide exemplary service to students in pre-kindergarten through higher education. The Act would require the Secretary to choose an awardee each year, out of nominations received from each state, from each of the following occupational specialties: (1) paraprofessionals; (2) clerical and administrative services; (3) transportation services; (4) food and nutrition services; (5) custodial and maintenance services; (6) security services; (7) health and student services; (8) technical services; and (9) skilled trades. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 547.

The Student Non-Discrimination Act of 2011 (S. 555) (111th S. 3390), introduced by Senator Franken (D-MN) would prohibit public school students from being excluded from participating in, or subject to discrimination under, any federally-assisted educational program on the basis of their actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity or that of their associates. The bill includes harassment as a form of discrimination, protects against retaliation against those opposing unlawful conduct, and establishes a right of action in a judicial proceeding for aggrieved individuals. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 555.

The Rural Education Achievement Program Reauthorization Act of 2011 (S. 567) (111th S. 1052), introduced by Senator Conrad (D-ND) would amend part B (Rural Education Initiative) of Title VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to revise the Small, Rural School Achievement program by limiting eligibility to LEAs whose schools are all designated with a school locale code of Fringe Rural, Distant Rural, or Remote Rural, unless located in an area the state defines as rural. The Act would raise federal grant limits when funds available to implement the program equal or exceed $100 million. The Act would alter LEA eligibility for federal funds under the Rural and Low-Income School program by requiring that: (1) at least 40% of the children ages 5 through 17 that LEAs serve be eligible for a free or reduced price lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act; and (2) all of their schools be designated with a school locale code of Distant Town, Remote Town, Fringe Rural, Distant Rural, or Remote Rural. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 567.

The Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2011 (S. 571), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would amend subtitle B of Title VII of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act to provide more funding, resources and attention toward the education of homeless children and youths. [The companion bill is H.R. 1253 introduced by Representative Biggert (R-IL).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 571.

The Fitness Integrated with Teaching Kids (FIT Kids) Act (S. 576), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to require annual state and local educational agency report cards to include specified information on school health and physical education programs; foster training of physical and health education teachers on improving students' health habits and participation in physical activities; and would call for a study that: (1) assesses the affect health and physical education have on students' ability to learn; and (2) makes recommendations for improving and measuring student health and physical education in schools. [The companion bill is H.R. 1057 introduced by Representative Kind (D-WI).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 576.

The Full-Service Community Schools Act of 2011 (S. 585) (111th S. 1165), introduced by Senator Nelson (D-NE) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to: (1) consortia composed of a local educational agency and one or more community-based, nonprofit, or other public or private entities to assist public elementary or secondary schools to function as full-service community schools; and (2) state collaboratives to support the development of full-service community school programs. The bill would require such schools to: (1) participate in community-based efforts to coordinate educational, developmental, family, health, and other comprehensive services through community-based organizations and public and private partnerships; and (2) provide access to such services to students, families, and the community. The bill would give local grant priority to consortia that: (1) will serve at least two full-service community schools eligible for schoolwide programs under the Act, and more than one full-service community school as part of a community or districtwide strategy; (2) demonstrate a record of effectiveness in coordinating multiple qualified services; and (3) will be connected to a school and community partnership group that brings together key stakeholders, including teacher unions, across varied sectors to improve results for students and their families. [The companion bill is H.R. 1090 introduced by Representative Hoyer (D-MD).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 585.

The Impact Aid Timely Repayment Act of 2011 (S. 595) (111th S. 3914), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would amend Title VIII (Impact Aid) of the ESEA to require the Secretary of Education to complete Impact Aid payments to eligible local educational agencies (LEAs) within three fiscal years of their appropriation. (The Impact Aid program compensates LEAs for the financial burden of federal activities affecting their school districts.) See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 595.

The Supporting Community Schools Act of 2011 (S. 616), introduced by Senator Sanders (I-VT) would amend Title I Part A of the ESEA to authorize LEAs to use school improvement funds to transform schools identified as needing improvement, corrective action, or restructuring into community schools. The bill defines a "community school" as a public elementary or secondary school that partners with community-based entities, both public and private, to address students' academic, health, and developmental needs while also serving as a community center that provides or hosts relevant community services. The bill requires such schools to be based on research into successful practices in: (1) improving student achievement or growth, (2) closing achievement gaps between groups of students, and (3) increasing student attendance and graduation rates. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 616.

Note: The NEA supports a school improvement approach that would allow all struggling or “priority” schools, after engaging in a comprehensive review process, to choose strategies within the community schools model or other models that best meet local needs and have evidence of success, rather than picking a single model.

The STEM 2 Act (S. 619), introduced by Senator Udall (D-NM)would amend the ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive planning grants to states, Indian tribes or tribal organizations, nonprofit organizations, or institutions of higher education to develop effective state or tribal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) networks that coordinate STEM education efforts. The bill also would provide grants to entities to carry out a training program, using best practice models and through summer institutes or other professional development enrichment programs, which provides professional development regarding STEM education to STEM teachers (including STEM teachers who are master teachers or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of STEM teaching) and administrators. The bill would also establish a national panel to identify and recommend the most effective STEM curricula models for kindergarten through grade 12. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 619.

The Fiscal Fairness Act (S. 701), introduced by Senator Bennet (D-CO) would amend Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to condition local educational agency (LEA) receipt of school improvement funds on: (1) an average state and local spending per pupil in each school receiving school improvement funds of at least 97% of such spending per pupil across all schools that are not receiving such funds; and (2) an average state and local spending per pupil in each higher poverty school of at least 97% of such spending per pupil across all lower poverty schools, if the LEA is serving all of its schools under Title I, Part A. The bill would allow LEAs to meet such requirement across all schools or among schools serving a particular grade span if they compare schools within no more than three grade spans. The bill would direct the Inspector General of the Department of Education, in the fourth and fifth years after this Act’s enactment, to audit 5 states and 10 LEAs to determine their progress in meeting these requirements. The bill would require annual LEA report cards to include certain information on state and local spending per pupil in schools. The bill would require states to provide the public with annual up-to-date school-by-school listings of per-pupil state and local spending. [The companion measure is H.R. 1294 introduced by Representative Fattah (D-PA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 701.

The Innovation Inspiration School Grant Program Act ( S. 716) (111th S. 3732), introduced by Senator Shaheen (D-NH) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) promote science, technology, engineering (including robotics), and mathematics (STEM) in secondary schools; (2) support the participation of secondary school students in nontraditional STEM teaching methods; and (3) broaden secondary school students' access to STEM careers. The bill gives priority to grant applications that target: (1) a rural or urban school, (2) a low-performing school or LEA, or (3) an LEA or school that serves students who are eligible for free or reduce price lunches under the school lunch program. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 716.

The STEM Master Teacher Corps Act of 2011 (S. 758), introduced by Senator Franken (D-MN) would amend the ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to consortia of local educational agencies (LEAs) or states, acting in partnership with institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations to establish a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Master Teacher Corps program. The bill would requires grantees to: (1) select exemplary elementary and secondary school STEM teachers for membership in the STEM Master Teacher Corps; (2) provide those teachers with compensation that supplements their base salaries for taking on additional duties and leadership roles, with higher compensation going to those teaching at high-need public schools; (3) provide, and track the effectiveness of, research-based training for Corps members; (4) provide discretionary resources for Corps members at high-need schools to use; (5) help coordinate instructional leadership and mentoring roles for Corps members; and (6) facilitate efforts by Corps members to inform STEM education policy at the national, state, and local levels. The bill gives grant priority to applicants that intend to include: (1) large numbers of teachers in the STEM Master Teacher Corps; and (2) rural schools, particularly high-need rural schools, in the area they serve. The bill requires grantees to ensure that at least 75% of their STEM Master Teacher Corps are teachers at high-need schools. The bill directs the Secretary, acting through the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences, to: (1) evaluate the STEM Master Teacher Corps program; (2) identify optimal strategies for designing and advancing such program; and (3) identify best practices for developing, supporting, and retaining STEM teachers based on lessons learned from the program. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 758.

The Every Student Counts Act (S. 767) (111th S. 618), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to require, beginning by the 2010-2011 school year, states, local educational agencies (LEAs), and secondary schools annually to include on the report cards required under Title I of the Act: (1) their four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate; (2) the final number of students in their four-year adjusted cohort and their total number of four-year graduates; (3) their cumulative graduation rate; (4) the number and percentage of students graduating in more than four years with a regular secondary school diploma; (5) the number and percentage of students who have been removed from the adjusted cohort; (6) the number and percentage of students from each previous adjusted cohort who remain in secondary school after four years; and (7) the percentage of secondary school students in each grade, except the graduating grade, prepared to advance to the next grade. The Act would also require such data to be disaggregated by race, ethnicity, gender, disability status, migrant status, English proficiency, and status as economically disadvantaged. The Act would allow certain LEAs and schools to provide annual interim graduation rate calculations through the 2011-2012 school year. The Act would require the use of aggregate and disaggregated cumulative graduation rates in determining adequate yearly progress (AYP). The Act would also require states, LEAs, and schools that have a cumulative graduation rate below 90% overall or for any of the student subgroups, to make specified yearly progress in improving such rate or be deemed as failing to make AYP. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 767.

The LEAD Act (S. 812) (111th S. 3469), introduced by Senator Bennet (D-CO) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to direct the Secretary of Education to award a competitive grant to a partnership between a nonprofit organization and an institution of higher education (IHE) to establish a school leadership academy, and thereafter school leadership “centers of excellence,” that develop and provide evidence-based leadership training to school leaders (turnaround leaders) and their supporting mentors (turnaround mentors) to transform and improve turnaround schools. The bill would direct the centers to: (1) adopt and adapt the leadership training program developed by the school leadership academy so that such program is informed, on an ongoing basis, by evidence regarding effective school leadership and meets the needs of the local educational agencies they serve; and (2) work with the school leadership academy to best train and support program participants. Additionally, the bill would require the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences to support: (1) research on identifying the skills and conditions necessary for school leaders to improve turnaround schools, and (2) evaluations of this Act's programs and activities. The bill would define “turnaround schools” as schools that are subject to corrective action or restructuring under the ESEA or are secondary schools that have a graduation rate below 60%. Leadership training participants at the academy and the centers of excellence would receive a stipend for participating and agree to serve for at least four years at turnaround schools. [The companion measure is H.R. 1524 by Representative Payne (D-NJ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 812.

The Promoting Innovations to 21st Century Careers Act (S. 830) (111th S. 1532), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would authorize the Director of the National Academic and Career Innovation Center to award certain planning, implementation, transitional, and supplemental grants to state pathways partnerships to carry out activities that will create and enhance educational and career pathways for high school students to postsecondary schools (including registered apprenticeship programs) and to 21st century careers, particularly in high skill, high demand industries; would require the state partnerships to be appointed by state Governors and include representatives from educational, business, labor, workforce, and economic development entities in their respective states; and would establish the National Academic and Career Innovation Center to: (1) support the efforts of the state partnerships and regional partnerships (which are to receive competitive implementation subgrants from state partnerships) to offer career pathways of proven effectiveness; (2) design and conduct performance evaluations of career pathways activities; and (3) administer, oversee, and evaluate all career pathways grants. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 830.

The Success in the Middle Act of 2011 (S. 833) (111th S. 1362), introduced by Senator Whitehouse (D-RI) would authorize $1 billion per year for states to carry out a plan that shows what students are required to know and do to successfully complete the middle grades and make the transition to succeed in an academically rigorous high school that prepares students for postsecondary education and the workplace; and would provide $100 million per year to develop or adapt effective practices to turn around low-performing middle schools, and to strengthen research focused on the middle grades. [The companion measure is H.R. 1547 by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 833.

The Time for Innovation Matters in Education Act of 2011 (S. 851) (111th S. 1410), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA) would provide grants to LEAs and partnerships for expanded learning time and redesigning schools and programs to improve student achievement through longer school days (at least 300 additional hours), additional school days or a combination of longer school days and additional school days, as well as other methods. The bill would require proposed initiatives to expand learning time for all students in all grade levels in participant schools, though on-site prekindergarten programs may be excepted. The bill would require the Secretary to contract with an independent organization to evaluate the Act’s effectiveness. The bill would require “evidence of an agreement reached between each participating local educational agency and the exclusive recognized representative of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, for employees to work the expanded learning time schedules involved or, where there is no such representative, evidence of an agreement supported (by at least two-thirds) of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, to work the expanded learning time schedules involved.” [The companion measure is H.R. 1636 by Representative Payne (D-NJ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 851.

The Financial Literacy for Students Act of 2011 (S. 853) (111th S. 1339), introduced by Senator Hagan (D-NC) would amend Part V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to states to: (1) integrate financial literacy education into their public middle and secondary schools; and (2) provide training to financial literacy teachers in such schools. The bill would authorize the Secretary to award grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) for the provision of financial literacy training and assistance to parents and students. The bill would encourage LEA grantees to partner with community organizations, financial institutions, or local businesses when implementing such program. The bill would require the Director of the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection to coordinate the activities funded under this Act with the activities carried out by any financial education research center operated by a Federal Reserve bank. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 853.

The Aid Gifted and High-Ability Learners by Empowering the Nation’s Teachers (TALENT) Act (S. 857) (see 111th H.R. 2036), introduced by Senator Grassley (D-IA) would create a part E (Gifted and Talented Students) under Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The Act would require states to: (1) recognize local educational agencies (LEAs) that significantly increase the proportion of their students, overall and in specified student subgroups, that score at or above the advanced level of achievement on such assessments; (2) assist their LEAs and schools in providing additional educational assistance to advanced, gifted, and talented students; and (3) report annually the most recent two-year trend in student achievement for students scoring in the highest 10% on the state assessments in each subject area and grade level. It would further require LEAs receiving school improvement funds to identify gifted and talented students and support their learning needs. The Act would additionally authorize LEAs to use funding under: (1) the small rural school achievement program to support gifted and talented students, and (2) the rural and low-income school program to train teachers to meet the unique learning needs of gifted and talented students. Further, the Act would establish grants to states, or institutions of higher education (IHEs) that partner with public or private agencies and organizations to assist them in meeting the educational needs of gifted and talented students, including by training school personnel in the identification and education of gifted and talented students. Finally, the Act would help establish a national research center on gifted and talented students. [The companion measure is H.R. 1674 by Representative Gallegly (D-CA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 857.

The Financial and Economic Literacy Improvement Act of 2011, (S. 865) (111th S. 638), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to direct the Secretary of Education to award formula matching grants to states or partnerships between states, experienced nonprofit providers of financial and economic literacy education, and experienced nonprofit providers of teacher training in such fields. The Act would require grantees to use 25% of the grant funds to: (1) develop financial and economic literacy standards and assessments for at least three grade levels; (2) create teacher training programs to embed financial and economic literacy education into core academic subjects; and (3) evaluate the impact such education has on students' financial and economic literacy. The Act would foster financial and economic literacy activities in schools and establish a clearinghouse of best practices and materials on the topic. The Act would also amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to direct the Secretary to award competitive grants to institutions of higher education (IHEs) or partnerships between IHEs, experienced nonprofit providers of financial and economic literacy education, and experienced nonprofit providers of teacher training in such fields for activities that increase student knowledge in consumer, economic, and personal financial concepts. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 865.

The Investing in Innovation for Education Act of 2011 (S. 895) (111th S. 3882), introduced by Senator Begich (D-AK) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) and nonprofit organizations to support school innovation efforts of public schools and LEAs. At least 25% of grant funds would have to be awarded for projects in rural areas. The bill would require each grant applicant to demonstrate that it has partnered with at least one private, nonprofit, or community-based organization that will provide matching funds, though the Secretary could waive the matching funds requirement upon a showing of exceptional circumstances. The bill requires each grant to be used to address at least one of the following areas of school reform: (1) improving the effectiveness of teachers and school leaders and promoting their equitable distribution; (2) strengthening the use of data to improve education; (3) providing high-quality instruction that is based on rigorous standards and measuring students' proficiency using high-quality assessments that are aligned to those standards; (4) turning around the lowest-performing schools; and (5) any other area of school reform the Secretary chooses. The bill would require the Secretary to establish performance measures for tracking each grantee's progress in improving the academic performance of public elementary and secondary school students, and specified subgroups of those students. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 895.

Note: NEA supports investing in innovation but is concerned about the “performance measures” used to track grantees’ progress.

The Simon Wiesenthal Holocaust Education Assistance Act (S. 900) (111th S. 892), introduced by Senator Menendez, R. (D-NJ) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to educational organizations to carry out proposed or existing Holocaust education programs. [The companion measure is H.R. 1753 by Representative Maloney (D-NY).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 900.

The School Building Fairness Act of 2011 (S. 902), (111th S. 1121), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to establish competitive grants for school repair, renovation, and construction. The Act would reserve a portion of grant funds for assistance to outlying or rural areas and Indian schools, schools serving poor children, and schools in need of repair and/or without fiscal capacity to cover repairs, renovation or construction. The Act would direct states to create databases and create a national study and clearinghouse on school repair, renovation and construction trends. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 902.

The Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students Act of 2011 (S. 919), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award grants to states to: (1) develop, improve, and implement state reporting and information systems that measure conditions for learning, based on surveys of school students and staff; and (2) award competitive subgrants to local educational agencies (LEAs) or nonprofit organizations that use such measurement systems to make comprehensive improvements to school-level conditions for learning. The bill identifies conditions conducive to learning as those that: (1) promote physical activity, education, fitness, and nutrition; (2) promote mental health; (3) prevent violence, harassment, and substance abuse among students; and (4) promote safe and supportive schools and communities. The bill would condition a state's grant eligibility on its: (1) having a statewide physical education requirement that is consistent with widely recognized standards; and (2) requiring its LEAs to establish policies that prevent and prohibit harassment in schools, notify students and parents of prohibited conduct each year, and provide students and parents with grievance procedures that target such conduct. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 919.

The Literacy Education for All, Results for the Nation (LEARN) Act (S. 929) (111th S. 2740), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to states (and subgrants to LEAs) for comprehensive planning to improve the literacy of children from birth through grade 12. Grant activities would cover birth to 12th grade and prioritize jurisdictions with a significant number or percentage of underperforming schools and high need areas. State activities may include technical assistance to subgrantees, coordinating literacy programs and resources throughout the state, disseminating information on promising literacy programs, and enhancing the credentials of literacy instructors. Where initiatives are not making significant progress in improving student literacy, the Act would authorize the Secretary to withhold funding from states and subgrantees, and authorize states to withhold funding from subgrantees. [The companion measure is H.R. 2272 by Representative Yarmuth (D-KY).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 929.

The Family Engagement in Education Act (S. 941) (111th H.R. 5211), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI) would amend Title I of ESEA to authorize states to reserve school improvement funds for the development and implementation of a statewide family engagement in education plan. The Act would require each state school improvement plan to include a plan for strengthening family engagement in education, and would require each LEA and school receiving school improvement funds to develop policies and practices for family engagement in education that meet specified principles and standards. The bill would specifically address family engagement for neglected or delinquent youth and create a State Family Engagement Coordinating Council and Statewide and Local Family Engagement Centers to assure coordination and integration of family engagement activities across the education spectrum. The bill would also authorize the use of Title II funds to train teachers and principals to effectively engage families in their children's education. To assist implementation, the Act would require the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences to develop recommended metrics on family engagement in education for states and LEAs, and make recommendations on the integration of those metrics into state accountability and longitudinal data systems. [The companion measure is H.R. 1821 by Representative Platts (R-PA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 941.

The E 2 for Innovation Act (S. 969), introduced by Senator Gillibrand (D-NY) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award planning grants and matching implementation grants to states to integrate engineering education into kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) instruction and curricula. The bill would require each state that desires an implementation grant to develop quantifiable benchmarks for activities supported by such grants and submit them to the Secretary for approval. The bill requires states to use implementation grants to: (1) establish assessment tools and challenging academic content and achievement standards for engineering education, (2) develop or obtain effective engineering education curricula, (3) develop or improve engineering teacher training programs, and (4) recruit qualified engineering teachers for needy schools. The bill authorizes states to use such grants to: (1) facilitate distance learning and online education in engineering, and (2) invest in after-school engineering education programs. The bill directs the Institute of Education Sciences to support engineering education research and an evaluation of this Act’s grant programs, and requires the Secretary to use the evaluation’s findings to provide information to the public and technical assistance to states on best practices and promising innovations in K-12 engineering education. [The companion measure is H.R. 1951 by Representative Tonko (D-NY).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 969.

The Promise Neighborhoods Act of 2011 (S. 1004), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive, matching Promise Neighborhood Partnership grants to nonprofit organizations that partner with a local educational agency (LEA) to implement a comprehensive continuum of supports and services that engage community partners in improving the academic achievement, health and social development, and college and career readiness of children that live in distressed neighborhoods with underperforming schools. The bill would authorize the Secretary to award competitive, matching Promise School grants to LEAs that partner with nonprofit organizations, and Indian or charter schools that partner with nonprofit organizations or institutions of higher education, to implement school-centered strategies and integrated student supports that leverage community partnerships to improve student achievement and development in schools with high concentrations of low-income children. Renewal of grants would be contingent on demonstrated significant success in: (1) ensuring children's school readiness; (2) improving their academic outcomes; (3) increasing their college and career readiness; and (4) improving their health, mental health, and social and emotional well-being. [The companion bill is H.R. 2098 by Representative Payne (D-NJ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1004.

The Foreign Language Education Partnership Program Act (S. 1015) (see 111th H.R. 4065), introduced by Senator Lautenberg (D-NJ) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to replace the program providing incentive payments to public elementary schools for foreign language instruction with a partnership program in foreign languages that provides matching incentive payments to partnerships composed of state or local educational agencies and institutions of higher education. The bill would require such partnerships to establish, improve, or expand model programs of foreign language learning from kindergarten through grade 12 that increase the number of high school graduates who attain advanced proficiency in at least one foreign language. The bill would require each model program to have a dimension allowing the student to gain an understanding of the historic, geographic, cultural, economic, and other contextual factors of countries whose people speak the language studied. Continued funding for two additional five-year periods, after an initial four-year funding period, would be based on program effectiveness based on nationally recognized standardized foreign language assessments. [The companion measure is H.R. 1966 by Representative Holt (D-NJ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1015.

The Secondary School Reentry Act of 2011 (S. 1019), introduced by Senator Sanders (D-VT) would amend ESEA Title I, Part H to make consortia of local educational agencies (LEAs) eligible to receive school dropout prevention grants and subgrants. The bill would require LEAs to use at least 30% of the funds to implement reentry programs that assist school dropouts in returning to the educational system to obtain a secondary school diploma. Reentry programs would be implemented by partnerships between a state, an LEA or consortium of LEAs, and at least one other enumerated entity. The bill would require states to include certain student dropout and reentry information in their annual report cards under ESEA Title I, Part A. The bill would amend Title I, Part D to require states to work with LEAs in developing and implementing school reentry programs for neglected, delinquent, and at-risk youth. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1019.

The Prepare all Kids Act of 2011 (S. 1156) (111th S. 839), introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA) would amend Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to establish a Prekindergarten Incentive Fund for qualified pre-kindergarten providers to establish, expand, or enhance voluntary high quality full-day pre-kindergarten programs serving children ages three through five. The Act would also provide for early childhood development programs for children ages zero through three and foster extended early childhood day and year programs. [The companion measure is H.R. 2331 by Representative Maloney (D-NY).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1156.

The English Learning and Innovation Act of 2011 (S. 1158), introduced by Senator Bennet (D-CO) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award renewable, competitive Innovation grants to states, local educational agencies (LEAs), and public charter schools or charter school management organizations to carry out activities that result in English language learners (ELLs) becoming proficient in English so that they can access the knowledge needed to meet state college and career readiness standards. Includes among those activities: (1) improving instructional programs, including through the use of dual-language or bilingual education; (2) ensuring that English learners are taught by effective teachers at schools administered by effective principals; (3) increasing the ability of the families of English learners to engage in their child's education and development; and (4) expanding best practices to other schools or LEAs. The bill would also authorize the Secretary to award competitive capacity building grants to states and LEAs that have experienced a significant increase in ELL students. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1158.

The Ready to Learn Act (S. 1170) (111th S. 240), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to states and, through them, subgrants to schools, child care entities, Head Start programs, or other community-based prekindergarten providers for high-quality full day voluntary prekindergarten programs that prepare four-year olds for school. The bill would require that such programs: (1) first serve children whose family income is no higher than 200% of the poverty level or who are limited English proficient; (2) ensure that, within two years of grant receipt, each classroom is taught by a teacher who has at least a baccalaureate degree in early childhood education or such a degree and specialized training in early childhood development; (3) use curricula that are aligned with state early learning standards; and (4) have teacher-child ratios of no more than 1 to 10 and group sizes of no more than 20. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1170.

The 21st Century Readiness Act (S. 1175), introduced by Senator Hagan (D-NC) would amend the ESEA to support 21st century readiness initiatives that fuse core academic subject knowledge and higher-order thinking skills (such as critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity, and innovation) to ensure that students are prepared for postsecondary education and careers upon graduation from secondary school. The bill would amend Title I to require the Secretary to examine the extent to which programs and initiatives improve student readiness for postsecondary education and careers. The bill would amend Title II to require high-quality professional development programs to incorporate an aligned system of teaching and learning that includes 21st century skills, standards, curriculum, instruction, and assessments. The bill amends Title IV (21st Century Schools) to include 21st century readiness initiatives in 21st Century Community Learning Center activities. The bill would amend Title VI to allow assessment grants to be used by states to develop or improve assessments that use technology to measure core academic subject knowledge and higher-order thinking skills. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1175.

The Graduation Promise Act of 2011 (S. 1177) (111th S. 1698), introduced by Senator Bingaman (D-NM) would authorize the Secretary of Education to make grants to states (and subgrants to LEAs) for differentiated high school improvement systems targeting support to schools with low student achievement and graduation rates after such schools fail for two consecutive years to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) pursuant to state academic performance standards. The bill would prioritize states with low graduation rates and a high percentage of students attending low-income LEAs. The bill requires state grantees to establish comprehensive school performance indicators and minimum annual improvement benchmarks to analyze school performance and determine the improvement category into which a school is placed. Subgrantees must categorize each of their schools that fail to make AYP for two consecutive years as needing targeted intervention, whole school reforms, or replacement; convene a local school improvement team for each of such schools that will use performance indicators, AYP measures, and other relevant data to conduct a school needs assessment and develop a multiyear school improvement plan tailored to the school's need categorization; and support the successful implementation of such plans and district-wide high school improvement strategies. The bill would authorize the Secretary to award competitive grants to LEAs, nonprofit organizations, and institutions of higher education to develop and implement, or replicate, effective secondary school models for struggling students and dropouts. [The companion bill is H.R. 4181 by Representative Hinojosa (D-TX).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1177.

[Note: NEA generally supports this bill but has concerns about the school improvement strategies language, especially the school “replacement” option. School improvement strategies must have strong language requiring local collaboration and determination of improvement strategies and protecting collective bargaining rights of employees.]

The Achievement Through Technology and Innovation Act of 2011 (S. 1178) (111th S. 818), introduced by Senator Bingaman (D-NM) would amend ESEA Title II to rename part D (Achievement through Technology and Innovation) and reauthorize it through FY2017. The bill requires states to use a portion of their allotted funds to develop challenging academic content and achievement standards to ensure that students are technologically literate before the end of grade eight. The bill specifies that such standards are only for tracking technological literacy and not for assessing adequate yearly progress (AYP) under Title I. The bill would permit technological literacy testing to be embedded in other state tests or performance-based assessments portfolios, or made through other valid and reliable means. The bill splits state funding for LEAs by 60/40 in terms of formula/competitive funding. The Act would require states to establish subgrant programs for LEAs to improve teaching and learning through technology and for systemic school redesign through technology integration. The Act would require LEAs to engage in long-range strategic educational technology planning, teacher training, and technology acquisition to support individualized learning. The Act would require the Secretary of Education to study, monitor and publish technology literacy results and to sponsor future research on best practices and programs on the topic. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1178.

The Advanced Programs Act of 2011 (S. 1179), introduced by Senator Bingaman (D-NM) would direct the Secretary of Education to allot grants to states, based on their share of low-income elementary and secondary school students, to cover part or all of the Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) examination fee low-income students incur. The bill would direct the Secretary to award competitive matching grants to states, local educational agencies (LEAs), or partnerships between a nonprofit organization and a state or LEA for activities that increase: (1) the number of qualified teachers at high-need schools who are teaching AP or IB courses; and (2) the number of students at high-need schools who enroll in, and pass the examination for, such courses. The bill would give priority in awarding the competitive grants to applicants that: (1) have a statewide or districtwide strategy for increasing the availability of AP or IB courses, and pre-AP or pre-IB courses, in high-need schools; (2) focus on increasing AP or IB courses in English, mathematics, and science; and (3) target schools with high concentrations of low-income students. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1179.

The Teachers Professional Development Institutes Act (S. 1240) (111th S. 3498), introduced by Senator Lieberman (I-CT) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to establish and operate Teacher Institutes, i.e., a partnership or joint venture between one or more IHEs and one or more LEAs serving one or more schools with significant low-income populations that is established to improve the quality of teaching and learning through collaborative seminars. [The companion measure is H.R. 2255 by Representative DeLauro (D-CT).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1240.

The Native Culture, Language, and Access for Success in Schools Act (S. 1262), introduced by Senator Akaka (D-HI) would amend titles I-V and VII of the ESEA to: 1) facilitate the inclusion of Indian tribes in the school improvement process; 2) enhance teacher and principal training and recruiting for Indian schools; 3) award grants to Indian and educational organizations for Native American language programs; 4) establish a Safe and Healthy Schools for Native American Students program, and; 5) facilitate the participation of Indian tribes in both Indian elementary and secondary education grant programs and fund Native American Language programs. It would also authorize tribes to enter into a cooperative agreement with a state or local educational agency (LEA) to assume the role of the state or LEA with respect to schools on Indian land, and would give Indian schools the same eligibility and consideration for any competitive program under the ESEA as LEAs are given. The bill would require all ESEA public school assistance programs to reserve 1% of their funding to provide Indian schools with the technical expertise and capacity to compete for such assistance. The bill would increase the flow of federal funds to Indian schools; support and ensure the enduring instruction in Indian schools of Native American language, history, and culture, and allocate greater oversight responsibility of Indian schools within the Department of Education. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1262.

The High School Data Transparency Act of 2011 (S. 1269), introduced by Senator Snowe (R-ME), would amend the ESEA to require the Secretary of Education to collect the following information annually from each coeducational secondary school that receives federal financial assistance and that has an interscholastic athletic program: (1) the number, gender, and race or ethnicity of students that attended the school; and (2) for each team that competed in athletic competition, the number, gender, and race or ethnicity of participants, the total expenditures, the number, gender, and employment status of trainers, medical personnel, and coaches, the number of competitions, and postseason record. The bill would require such schools to: (1) make such information available to students and potential students, upon request, and to the public by October 15 of each school year; (2) ensure that all students at the school are informed of their right to request such information; and (3) annually provide such information to the Secretary. The bill would require the Secretary to: (1) ensure that such information is posted on the Department of Education's website, (2) notify all secondary schools regarding the availability of the information, and (3) issue guidance on how to collect and report the information required under this Act. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1269.

The Reengaging Americans in Serious Education by Uniting Programs Act (S. 1279) (111th S. 1608), introduced by Senator Stabenow (D-MI) would direct the Secretary of Labor to award competitive, renewable, five-year grants to eligible partnerships to assist them in providing disadvantaged youth with the support needed to: (1) graduate from secondary school; (2) attain a postsecondary credential, including those offered by institutions of higher education, industry groups, or registered apprenticeship programs; and (3) secure and succeed in a family-supporting career. The bill would require each eligible partnership to include broad array of community representatives and would establish an accountability system to measure performance of each grantee. The bill would provide for evaluation of program and dissemination of best practices. [The companion measure is H.R. 2358 by Representative Kildee (D-MI).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1279.

The Secondary School Reform Act of 2011 (S. 1306), introduced by Senator Hagan (D-NC) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive, matching five-year grants to high-need local educational agencies that partner with public or private nonprofit organizations to assist schools in implementing innovative secondary school reform strategies. The bill would require grantees to use grant funds to: (1) implement an early warning indicator and intervention system to identify and assist struggling middle and secondary school students; (2) provide support and credit recovery opportunities for struggling secondary school students; (3) establish secondary school dropout recovery or reentry programs; (4) establish grade and school transition programs and supports from kindergarten through high school graduation; and (5) keep school staff, students, and families apprised of certain education requirements, processes, and opportunities. The bill would require grantees to use funds on efforts to: (1) reform secondary schools with a graduation rate below 75% which need improvement, and (2) improve the academic performance of students who attend middle schools that feed a majority of their students to those secondary schools. Reforms must include (1) personalized learning environments attuned to the needs of each student; (2) student engagement through service, experiential, and work-based learning; (3) flexible budget and hiring authority for school leaders; (4) training and collaborative opportunities for school staff; (5) improved curriculum and instruction; (6) an individual graduation plan for each student; and (7) Graduation Promise Academies, Career Academies, or Early College Schools which represent specified strategies that have proven effective in preparing students for graduation, college, and a career. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1306.

The Improving Student Achievement and Engagement through Expanded Learning Time Act of 2011 (S. 1311), introduced by Senator Sanders (D-VT) would amend the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program under Title IV of ESEA to create (1) one-year planning subgrants for use in developing and implementing expanded learning time programs as part of a community learning center; and (2) renewable, multi-year implementation subgrants for use in creating expanded learning time, before and after school, summer enrichment, or summer school programs as part of a community learning center. The bill defines an "expanded learning time program" as a program that: (1) applies to all students in a school; (2) increases total school hours by at least 300 hours through an expanded school day, week, or year schedule; and (3) provides additional time for instruction in core academic subjects and additional time for school staff to collaborate, plan, and engage in professional development across grades and subjects. The bill reauthorizes appropriations for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program for FY2012-FY2017. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1311.

Note: The NEA would add language included in S. 1410, the Time for Innovation Matters in Education Act of 2009 (Sponsor: Senator Kennedy) that required “evidence of an agreement reached between each participating local educational agency and the exclusive recognized representative of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, for employees to work the expanded learning time schedules involved or, where there is no such representative, evidence of an agreement supported (by at least two-thirds) of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, to work the expanded learning time schedules involved.”

The SKILLS Act (S. 1328) (see 111th H.R. 3928), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI) would amend part A of Title I of the ESEA to require the inclusion of effective school library programs in school improvement programs. The bill defines an "effective school library program" as one that: (1) is staffed by a state sanctioned school librarian; (2) has up-to-date materials and technology, including broadband; (3) includes regular collaboration between teachers and school librarians concerning school reform efforts; and (4) supports the development of digital literacy skills. The bill replace the existing program under subpart 4 (Improving Literacy Through School Libraries) of part B of title I of the ESEA with a new program (Improving Literacy and College and Career Readiness Through Effective School Library Programs) awarding competitive three-year grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) that serve students, 20% of whom are impoverished, to develop and enhance effective school library programs. The bill amends Title II of the ESEA to rename part A the Teacher, School Librarian, and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund. The bill requires states and LEAs to use funds under the program to train school librarians, and recruit and retain highly effective school librarians. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1328.

The After School for America's Children Act (S. 1370), introduced by Senator Boxer (D-CA) would amend the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program under Title IV of the ESEA to provide: (1) students with activities that are targeted to their academic needs and aligned with the instruction they receive during the school day, and (2) students' families with opportunities for active and meaningful engagement in their children's education. The bill includes Indian tribes or organizations among the local public or private entities that are eligible for grants. The bill requires states to favor applicants serving poor and academically struggling students. The bill would prohibit the Secretary or states from giving funding priority to applicants that propose to use the funds to extend the regular school day. The bill would reauthorize the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program through FY2017. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1370.

The No Child Left Inside Act (S. 1372) (111th S. 866), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to offer state grants to develop environmental literacy plans for pre-kindergarten through grade 12 that include environmental education standards, teacher training, and the development of more rigorous environmental education curricula. The Act would authorize the Secretary to award competitive matching grants to partnerships to improve and support environmental education by advancing content and achievement standards, developing or disseminating innovations or model programs, and conducting research. [The companion measure is H.R. 2547 by Representative Sarbanes (D-MD).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1372.

The Ready Schools Act of 2011 (S. 1439), introduced by Senator Brown (D-OH) would amend Title I of the ESEA to call for descriptions via school needs reviews of how LEAs will assist each of their elementary schools receiving Title I assistance. Such reviews would occur not less than once per three years, and would be used by schools to foster environments helping students to meet grade level expectations and make successful transitions. Reviews would also include, at a minimum, school needs regarding: 1) the use of developmentally appropriate curricula and assessments; 2) (appropriate services and supports for children with disabilities and children who are limited English proficient); 3) family and community engagement policies and practices; 4) building and maintaining a school climate that supports positive development and learning; 5) leadership and support for school staff, and; 6) outreach and collaboration with early childhood care and education providers in the school attendance area. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1439.

The SAFE Teen Act, (S. 1447), introduced by Senator Crapo (R-ID) would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (Title IV of ESEA) to combat dating violence, sexual violence, and emotional abuse among students ages 11-19. Steps would include: 1) instructing the Secretary to collect data on the incidence and relevant emotional indicators of dating violence, sexual violence, and emotional abuse, and; 2) demanding that applications for Safe Schools/Healthy Students grants assess the presence of such relationship problems and describe plans to address them. States would also be obliged to provide technical assistance to both LEAs and schools responding to incidents of dating violence. The bill would establish an "Innovation Fund" to replicate, refine, and test model strategies and projects to prevent and respond to dating violence for youth. [The companion measure is H.R. 2689 by Representative Moore (D-WI).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1447.

The Schools Utilizing Comprehensive and Community Engagement for Success Act (S. 1462) (111th S. 1411), introduced by Senator Mikulski (D-MD) would amend Title V of the ESEA to encourage and support parent, family and community involvement in schools, and to provide needed integrated services and comprehensive supports to children in order to help students stay in school, become successful learners and improve academic achievement. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1462.

The Measuring and Evaluating Trends for Reliability, Integrity, and Continued Success (METRICS) Act of 2011(S. 1464) (111th S. 3204), introduced by Senator Blumenthal (D-CT) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to states, LEAs or consortia of LEAs to improve access to and sharing and use of education data to improve student outcomes. The bill would require states to (1) implement aligned statewide education longitudinal data systems that link students P-20 and workforce data; (2) define policies and procedures for the collection of, access to, and use of education data; (3) protect the privacy, security, and confidentiality of student and educator data; (4) link education data with workforce data; (5) match teachers with teacher preparation and certification information; (6) standardize education data through the use of openly developed common education data standards; and (7) meet federal reporting requirements. The bill would offer competitive grants to high-need LEAs to develop and implement a comprehensive plan to: (1) provide interested parties and the public with access to student education data in a manner that ensures its integrity and respects student and educator privacy; (2) improve the ability of school leaders to use student data to improve schools and classroom instruction; and (3) improve the ability of teachers effectively to use student data through on-going, sustainable, and high-quality training. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1464.

The Early Intervention or Graduation Success Authorization Act of 2011 (S. 1495), introduced by Senator Murkowski (R-AK) would replace the School Dropout Prevention program under part H of Title I of ESEA with a program awarding competitive, renewable, five-year early intervention grants to states and, through them, subgrants to partnerships between local educational agencies (LEAs) and early childhood education providers that serve a high percentage of students who bear the risk factors for dropping out of school. State grantees would be required to: (1) create and periodically update a research-based Statewide Graduation Success Plan addressing the factors associated with the risk of not graduating from high school; (2) provide technical assistance to subgrantees; and (3) implement a Statewide Dropout Early Warning System to identify and direct effective services to children, from birth through elementary school, who are at risk of not graduating from high school. The bill would permit states to use grant funds to: (1) provide tuition assistance to students who agree to teach in an early childhood education program, (2) increase and monitor the quality of early childhood education, (3) design and implement a progression of aligned performance standards across all domains of learning from prekindergarten through postsecondary education, and (4) expand access to high-quality early childhood education for children most at risk of low proficiency in school. Subgrantees would be required to 1) use the Statewide Dropout Early Warning System to implement research-based, individualized interventions for at-risk students; (2) develop and implement individual learning plans for each at-risk early childhood or elementary school student; (3) provide teacher training; (4) integrate community and family support services; and (5) foster students' high expectations and improve their chances for academic success. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1495.

The Building upon Unique Indian Learning and Development Act (S. 1519), introduced by Senator Udall (D-NM) would amend Title I of ESEA to provide for improved Native American student support and native language instruction; Title IV to improve health and safety of Native American students; Title VII to enable the Secretary to award grants to eligible entities to create or expand the pipeline for teachers and administrators of Native American students; Title VIII to make appropriations for Impact Aid; and Title IX to increase the reservation of funds for schools serving Native American students. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1519.

Note: NEA supports the overall goals of this bill; however, we do not support the wholesale waiver of HQT provisions or state licensure for native language instructors who are teachers of record for students.

The Fix America’s Schools Today Act of 2011(S. 1597), introduced by Senator Brown (D-OH) would direct the Secretary of Education to allocate grants to states and, through them, subgrants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to modernize, renovate, or repair early learning or elementary or secondary education facilities. The bill would require the Secretary to allocate grants directly to the 100 LEAs with the largest numbers of children aged 5-17 living in poverty to modernize, renovate, or repair such facilities. The bill prohibits the use of such grants for new construction, routine janitorial costs, or on facilities used for events for which the public is charged admission. The bill would also direct the Secretary to allocate grants to states to modernize, renovate, or repair existing facilities at community colleges. [The companion bill is HR 2948 introduced by Representative DeLauro (D-CT).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1597.

The Facilitating Outstanding Classrooms Using Size Act (S. 1661) (111th S. 2887), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA) would amend Title V of the ESEA to require the Secretary of Education to award formula grants to states for allocation to their local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) reduce class size, particularly in the early elementary grades, introduced by using highly qualified teachers; and (2) create a continuum of small classes from kindergarten through third grade for all their students. The bill would permit LEAs to use such funds to recruit highly qualified teachers, test new teachers, and provide professional development that enables teachers to teach effectively in their content areas. The bill requires that 80 percent of an LEA’s allocation to be based on its proportion of the state's low-income students, with the remainder based on its proportion of the state’s enrolled students. The bill requires LEAs that receive allocations to provide written notice to the parent of each child who is taught for two or more consecutive weeks introduced by a substitute teacher or a teacher who is not highly qualified. The bill directs the Secretary to: (1) provide for an independent evaluation of this Act's effectiveness in reducing class size and improving teaching in small classrooms; and (2) develop and maintain, through the National Center for Education Statistics, a database that accurately calculates class size for every school, school district, and state. The bill amends the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002 to require the National Center for Education Research, in the Institute of Education Sciences, to develop and maintain a web-based National Clearinghouse on Class Size to inform the public regarding class size reduction research, resources, and best practices. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1661.

The Effective Teaching and Leading Act (S. 1674), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI) would amend Title II of the ESEA to create a new Part E: Building School Capacity for Effective Teaching and Leadership. The bill would direct the Secretary of Education to allot grants to states for subgrants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to improve teaching and school leadership through a system of teacher and principal induction, professional development, and evaluation that is developed, implemented, and evaluated in collaboration with local teacher, principal, and school leader organizations and preparation programs. The bill requires LEAs to include in such system: (1) a comprehensive, coherent, high quality formalized induction program for beginning teachers during their first two years of full-time employment; (2) high-quality effective professional development for teachers, principals, school librarians, and other school leaders at their lowest achieving schools; (3) a rigorous, transparent, and equitable teacher and principal evaluation system for all their schools; (4) ongoing high-quality support, coaching, and professional development for principals and other school leaders at their lowest achieving schools; (5) opportunities for teachers and school librarians to assume new school leadership roles and training regarding such roles; and (6) significant and sustainable stipends above a teacher's base salary for teachers that serve as mentors, instructional coaches, teacher leaders, or evaluators under these programs. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1674.

The Preparing Students for Success in the Global Economy Act of 2011 (S. 1675), introduced by Senator Merkley (D-OR) would direct the Secretary of Education to allot formula grants to states and, through them, award competitive subgrants to high-need local educational agencies (LEAs) or educational service agencies serving such LEAs to improve preschool and elementary and secondary school science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. The bill would require the Secretary to award the grants to states on a competitive basis if this Act’s funding falls below a specified amount. Allowable grant activities include: (1) recruiting, supporting, evaluating, and training STEM teachers; (2) developing and improving high-quality STEM curricula and instructional supports to improve student achievement in those subjects; and (3) integrating STEM instruction with instruction in reading, English language arts, or other academic subjects. The bill would direct the Secretary to award competitive grants to partnerships between states or LEAs and outside entities experienced in improving the effectiveness or retention of STEM teachers, to establish and operate a STEM master teacher corps program. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1675.

The Continuum of Learning Act of 2011 (S. 1677), introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA) would amend Titles I and II of the ESEA to foster a continuum of developmentally appropriate and effective learning to connect the early years of childhood education to K-12 education. The bill would require the inclusion of early learning guidelines and standards in state plans and ready school needs reviews introduced by LEAs as part of Title I. The bill would require more rigorous early learning requirements in licensing, certification and professional development as part of Title II. The bill contains a section prohibiting the use of assessments of young children for high-stakes purposes. [The companion bill is HR 2794 introduced by Representative Hirono (D-HI).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1677.

The Education for Tomorrow's Jobs Act (S. 1686), introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA) would amend Title I Part A of the ESEA to require local educational agencies receiving subgrants to describe how they will establish and carry out a school improvement program, including how they will create a network of schools or programs of study that integrate a rigorous curriculum emphasizing college and career readiness and wraparound support services; use school-level strategies to personalize students' educational experience; demonstrate their capacity to implement and sustain their program; involve institutions of higher education, employers, community-based organizations, parent organizations, and other stakeholders in the school improvement process; provide school staff and other stakeholders with high-quality training and technical assistance; facilitate student transitions from secondary schools that do not award diplomas to secondary schools that do, and from the latter to postsecondary education; enable their program through policies that may include budgeting, governance, curriculum, and scheduling autonomies; place students, when possible, in a school or program of study that the student or their parents choose; ensure that students are able to fully participate in their school or program of study and are not placed in a school or program of study on the basis of their prior academic achievement or status as a poor, minority, disabled, or limited English proficient student; and arrange for an ongoing and rigorous evaluation of their program, and disseminate best practices. [The companion bill is HR 3154 introduced by Representative Thompson (R-PA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1686.

The Assuring Successful Students through Effective Teaching Act of 2011 (S. 1716), introduced by Senator Sanders (I-VT) would amend the school improvement program under Title I of the ESEA to define “highly qualified teachers” as those that have: (1) completed a state-approved traditional or alternative teacher preparation program, where available; or (2) passed a rigorous state-approved teacher performance assessment and obtained full state certification. The bill defines “effective teachers” as highly qualified teachers that demonstrate certain qualities and have done so for at least three years, as measured introduced by a comprehensive teacher evaluation and support system developed introduced by the relevant local educational agency (LEA). The bill requires that LEAs ensure that poor, minority, disabled, and limited English proficient students are taught introduced by highly qualified and effective teachers at similar rates and ratios as other students. The bill requires states to provide additional supports to LEAs that fall short of that goal to assist them in providing (1) stronger teacher recruitment efforts, (2) efforts to improve teacher retention, and (3) ongoing teacher training. The bill requires LEAs to ensure that: (1) all their teachers are highly qualified no later than three years after this Act’s enactment, (2) that none of their public schools has a disproportionate percentage of teachers neither highly qualified nor effective, and (3) teachers who are not highly qualified are closely mentored and overseen introduced by an effective mentor teacher who is certified and effective in the mentored teacher's subject area. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1716.

The Early Learning Proficiency Act (S. 1722), introduced by Senator Boxer (D-CA) would require states to issue guidance to local educational agencies (LEAs) regarding permissible uses of school improvement funds under Title I Part A of the ESEA to serve preschool children. The bill would amend Title III of the ESEA to allow LEAs to use subgrant funds under the English language acquisition and language enhancement program to develop and implement prekindergarten language programs. The bill would direct the Secretary of Education to issue guidance to LEAs on the use of funds under Title III of the ESEA for prekindergarten programs. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1722.

The Teachers and First Responders Back to Work Act (S. 1723
), introduced by Senator Menendez (D-NJ) would provide $30 billion for the costs of retaining, recalling, rehiring, or hiring employees to provide early childhood, elementary, or secondary education and related services; provide $5 billion for the hiring, rehiring, or retention of career law enforcement officers and the hiring of firefighters; and amend the tax on modified adjusted gross income over $1 million. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1723.

The School Accountability Improvements Act (S. 1724) (111th S. 1430), introduced by Senator Murkowski (R-AK) would allow states to utilize growth models under AYP; allow schools or districts that miss AYP solely due to either the students with disabilities subgroup and/or the ELL subgroup to implement an improvement plan targeted to those groups and alleviate them from the other AYP consequences; reverses the order of supplemental services and school choice, targets both choice and SES to students who are not proficient, and allows districts in need of improvement to be SES providers; provides flexibility for teachers in small schools to meet the highly qualified teacher rules; provides some flexibility in meeting AYP for schools which have students enrolled in Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or America Indian language programs; and improves parental involvement provisions. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1724.

The Real Education for Healthy Youth Act of 2011 (S. 1782), introduced by Senator Lautenberg (D-NJ) would foster comprehensive, evidence-based sex education in public schools and provide for the reduction of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and the promotion of healthy relationships. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1782.

Student-to-School Nurse Ratio Improvement Act of 2012 (S. 2047), introduced by Senator Schumer (D-NY) would provide for demonstration grants to eligible LEAs for the purpose of reducing the student-to-school nurse ratio in public secondary schools, elementary schools, and kindergartens.[Related bill is HR 2229 introduced by Representative McCarthy (D-NY)]. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2047.

The Josh Miller Helping Everyone Access Responsive Treatment in Schools (Josh Miller HEARTS) Act of 2012 (S. 2106) (111th S. 1197), introduced by Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) purchase automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for use in their schools; and/or (2) provide training to meet the grant requirement that at least five adult employees or volunteers at each school where an AED is to be used successfully complete training in its use and in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The Act would require LEAs to reform their emergency response procedures, and would prioritize schools that lack AEDs, are heavily populated, or lack access to emergency services or rural emergency funding. [The companion measure is HR 1377 introduced by Representative Sutton (D-OH)]. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2106.

The Keep Investing in Developmental Success (KIDS) Act of 2012 (S. 2180), introduced by Senator Begich (D-AK) would amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to: provide a tax credit for professional school personnel in early childhood education: extend until 2017 the tax deduction for certain expenses of eligible educators and expand the definition of "eligible educators" to include teachers, instructors, counselors, or aides in a preschool or early childhood program: and modify the credit for dependent care services. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2180.

The Helping Schools Protect Our Children Act of 2012 (S. 3173), introduced by Senator Feinstein (D-CA) would amend the ESEA to include training of school personnel to recognize child sexual abuse among the uses of grants to states and subgrants to local educational agencies and partnerships under Title II. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 3173.

The Helping Schools Protect Our Children Act of 2012 (S. 3173), introduced by Senator Feinstein (D-CA) would amend the ESEA to include training of school personnel to recognize child sexual abuse among the uses of grants to states and subgrants to local educational agencies and partnerships under Title II. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 3173.

S. 3711, a bill to provide secondary school students with the opportunity to participate in a high-quality internship program as part of a broader district-wide work-based learning program by Sen. Blumenthal (D-CT) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants, on a competitive basis, to eligible entities for the development and implementation of equitable, comprehensive, opportunities for secondary school students to participate in an internship program as part of a broader work-based learning continuum.  Eligible entities means an entity that—(A) is comprised of one or more LEAs or area career and technical education schools as defined; (B) has entered into a memorandum of understanding with not less than one business or industry partner in an in-demand industry sector or occupation, a State or local workforce board,  a community-based or nonprofit organization, or a qualified intermediary; and (C) may include an institution of higher education. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 3711. 

House


The Eating Disorders Awareness, Prevention, and Education Act of 2011 (H.R. 36) (111th H.R. 26), introduced by Representative Biggert (R-IL) would amend Title V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act by making it an allowable use of funds to improve the identification of students with eating disorders, increase awareness of such disorders among parents and students, train educators on effective eating disorder prevention and assistance methods, and study the impact of eating disorders on educational advancement and achievement. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 36.

The Restorative Justice in Schools Act of 2011 (H.R. 415) (111th H.R. 4286), introduced by Representative Cohen (D-TN) would amend Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to allow a local educational agency to use Title II subgrants to train school personnel in restorative justice and conflict resolution. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 415.

The High School Athletics Accountability Act of 2011 (H.R. 458) (111th H.R. 2882), introduced by Representative Slaughter (D-NY) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to direct coeducational elementary and secondary schools to make available to the public information on equality in school athletic programs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 458.

The Protecting Student Athletes from Concussions Act of 2011 (H.R. 469) (111th H.R. 6172), introduced by Representative Bishop (D-NY) would require SEAs to issue regulations requiring LEAs to post information aobut the risk of concussions caused by participation in school sports and take other preventive and responsive measures in exchange for ESEA funding. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 469.

The Impact Aid Fairness and Equity Act of 2011 (H.R. 472) (111th H.R. 3651), introduced by Representative Boren (D-OK) would reauthorize the Impact Aid program and direct appropriations toward emergency construction and modernization for certain LEAs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 472.

The Assessment Accuracy and Improvement Act (H.R. 507) (111th H.R. 655), introduced by Representative Petri (R-WI) would amend Title I of the ESEA to allow States to use adaptive assessments (rather than the assessments otherwise required by NCLB) that accurately assess student achievement above and below grade level while also measuring grade-level performance. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 507.

The Universal Prekindergarten Act (H.R. 555) (111th H.R. 555), introduced by Representative Kucinich(D-OH)would assist states in establishing a universal prekindergarten program to ensure that all children 3, 4 and 5 years old have access to a high-quality full-day, full-calendar-year prekindergarten education. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 555.

H.R. 646 (111th H.R. 178), introduced by Representative Serrano (D-NY) would authorize $1 billion for each of fiscal years 2011 through 2015 to recruit, hire, and train 100,000 new classroom paraprofessionals in order to improve educational achievement for children. Up to 25 percent of the funds would be used to provide professional development to paraprofessionals. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 646.

The Put School Counselors Where They’re Needed Act (H.R. 667) (111th H.R. 5671), introduced by Representative Sanchez (D-CA) would fund additional secondary school counselors in troubled Title I schools to reduce the dropout rate. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 667.

The Graduation Promise Act of 2011 (H.R. 778) (111th H.R. 4181), introduced by Representative Hinojosa (D-TX) would authorize the Secretary of Education to make grants to states (and subgrants to LEAs) for differentiated high school improvement systems targeting support to schools with low student achievement and graduation rates after such schools fail for two consecutive years to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) pursuant to state academic performance standards. The bill would prioritize states with low graduation rates and a high percentage of students attending low-income LEAs. The bill requires state grantees to establish comprehensive school performance indicators and minimum annual improvement benchmarks to analyze school performance and determine the improvement category into which a school is placed. Subgrantees must categorize each of their schools that fail to make AYP for two consecutive years as needing targeted intervention, whole school reforms, or replacement; convene a local school improvement team for each of such schools that will use performance indicators, AYP measures, and other relevant data to conduct a school needs assessment and develop a multiyear school improvement plan tailored to the school's need categorization; and support the successful implementation of such plans and district-wide high school improvement strategies. The bill would authorize the Secretary to award competitive grants to LEAs, nonprofit organizations, and institutions of higher education to develop and implement, or replicate, effective secondary school models for struggling students and dropouts. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 778.

Phylicia’s Law (H.R. 788) (111th H.R. 729), introduced by Representative Rothman (D-NJ) would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools program in Title IV of ESEA to help keep students safe by requiring school districts receiving funds under this program to provide an assurance that before every off-premises, overnight field trip, a written safety plan is developed by the school sponsoring the trip and provided to the parents of the children concerned. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 788.

The Transition-to-Success Mentoring Act (H.R. 853) (111th H.R. 5753), introduced by Representative Carson (D-IN) would reauthorize appropriations under Title I Part H (School Dropout Prevention) and would establish a transition-to-success mentoring program with five-year grants to LEA’s or partnerships between LEAs and community-based nonprofit organizations for school-based mentoring programs to assist at-risk students in transitioning from middle to high school. Requires grantees to assign to each at-risk student a success coach and authorizes the use of grant funds to train success coaches and cover the cost of any materials they use. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 853.

The Keep Our Promises to America’s Children and Teachers (PACT) Act (H.R. 864) (111th H.R. 1102), introduced by Representative Van Hollen (D-MD) would require full funding of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Act. Makes appropriations for: (1) school improvement programs under part A of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 for FY2011-FY2015; and (2) the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, including specified amounts for FY2011-FY2015 and an amount determined pursuant to a specified formula (based on the number of children who received special education, the average per-pupil expenditure, and the rate of change in a state's population) for FY2016 and thereafter. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 864.

The Teaching Geography is Fundamental Act (H.R. 885) (111th H.R. 1240), introduced by Representative Van Hollen (D-MD) would improve and expand geographic literacy among kindergarten through grade 12 students in the United States by improving professional development programs for kindergarten through grade 12 teachers offered through institutions of higher education. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 885.

H.R. 888 (111th H.R. 4695), to amend title VIII the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to provide financial assistance to local educational agencies that educate alien children admitted to the United States as citizens of one of the Freely Associated States by Representative Bordallo (D-Guam), would amend the Impact Aid program (which compensates local educational agencies [LEAs] for the financial burden of federal activities affecting their areas) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to compensate LEAs for educating children who are admitted into this country as citizens of one of the Freely Associated States (the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau). See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 888.

The Fast Track to College Act of 2011 (H.R. 925) (111th H.R. 1578), introduced by Representative Kildee (D-MI) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award matching six-year grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) that partner with institutions of higher education (IHEs) to establish or support dual enrollment programs, such as early college high schools, that allow high school students to earn credit simultaneously toward a high school diploma and a postsecondary degree or certificate. The Act would also authorize the Secretary to award matching five-year grants to states to: (1) plan and implement statewide strategies to make dual enrollment programs more accessible to students who are underrepresented in postsecondary education; (2) provide technical assistance to dual enrollment programs; and (3) engage in outreach, assessment, and teacher training activities designed to strengthen such programs. [The companion bill is S. 154 by Senator Kohl (D-WI).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 925.

The Anti-Bullying and Harassment Act of 2011 (H.R. 975) (111th H.R. 5184), introduced by Representative Davis (D-IL) would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act to require states to use grants for safe and drug-free schools to collect and report information on the incidence of bullying and harassment, would require local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools to use subgrants to prevent and respond to incidents of bullying and harassment. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 975.

The Student Non-Discrimination Act of 2011 (H.R. 998) (111th H.R. 4530), introduced by Representative Polis (D-CO) would prohibit public school students from being excluded from participating in, or subject to discrimination under, any federally-assisted educational program on the basis of their actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity or that of their associates. The bill includes harassment as a form of discrimination, protects against retaliation against those opposing unlawful conduct, and establishes a right of action in a judicial proceeding for aggrieved individuals. [The companion bill is S. 555 by Senator Franken (D-MN).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 998.

The Fitness Integrated with Teaching (FIT) Kids Act (H.R. 1057) (111th H.R. 1585), introduced by Representative Kind (D-WI) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) to require annual state and local educational agency report cards to include specified information on school health and physical education programs; foster training of physical and health education teachers on improving students' health habits and participation in physical activities; and would call for a study that: (1) assesses the affect health and physical education have on students' ability to learn; and (2) makes recommendations for improving and measuring student health and physical education in schools. [The companion bill is S. 576 by Senator Harkin (D-IA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1057.

The Full-Service Community Schools Act (H.R. 1090) (111th H.R. 3545), introduced by Representative Hoyer (D-MD) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to: (1) consortia composed of a local educational agency and one or more community-based, nonprofit, or other public or private entities to assist public elementary or secondary schools to function as full-service community schools; and (2) state collaboratives to support the development of full-service community school programs. The bill would require such schools to: (1) participate in community-based efforts to coordinate educational, developmental, family, health, and other comprehensive services through community-based organizations and public and private partnerships; and (2) provide access to such services to students, families, and the community. The bill would give local grant priority to consortia that: (1) will serve at least two full-service community schools eligible for schoolwide programs under the Act, and more than one full-service community school as part of a community or district wide strategy; (2) demonstrate a record of effectiveness in coordinating multiple qualified services; and (3) will be connected to a school and community partnership group that brings together key stakeholders, including teacher unions, across varied sectors to improve results for students and their families. [The companion bill is S. 585 by Senator Nelson (D-NE).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1090.

The Global Education in Nexus in U.S. (GENIUS) Act (H.R. 1109), introduced by Representative Sanchez (D-CA) would amend the Department of Education Organization Act to require the Deputy Assistant Secretary for International and Foreign Language Education to: (1) assist the Secretary of Education in administering this Act's grant program, and (2) develop an international education research repository and make it available to states and local educational agencies (LEAs).

Competitive grants would be made available to LEAs, or partnerships between LEAs and private organizations or institutions of higher education, to promote international education in elementary and secondary schools. Grantees would use (1) one-half of its grant on enhancing international education within core curricula, such as by increasing teacher competency; and (2) the other half on providing supplemental international education services outside of normal instruction hours. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1109.

The School Social Workers Improving Student Success Act (H.R. 1138), introduced by Representative Moore (D-WI) would amend the ESEA to establish a grant program to fund additional school social workers and retain school social workers already employed in high-need local educational agencies. The bill prohibits the grant funds from being used to supplant other federal, state, or local funds used for hiring and retaining school social workers. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1138.

Educational Success for Children and Youth Without Homes Act of 2011 (H.R. 1253), introduced by Representative Biggert (R-IL)would amend subtitle B of Title VII of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act to provide more funding, resources and attention toward the education of homeless children and youths. [The companion bill is S. 571 by Senator Murray (D-WA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1253.

Fiscal Fairness Act (H.R. 1294) (111th H.R. 5071), introduced by Representative Fattah (D-PA) would amend Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to condition local educational agency (LEA) receipt of school improvement funds on: (1) an average state and local spending per pupil in each school receiving school improvement funds of at least 97% of such spending per pupil across all schools that are not receiving such funds; and (2) an average state and local spending per pupil in each higher poverty school of at least 97% of such spending per pupil across all lower poverty schools, if the LEA is serving all of its schools under Title I, Part A. The bill would allow LEAs to meet such requirement across all schools or among schools serving a particular grade span if they compare schools within no more than three grade spans. The bill would direct the Inspector General of the Department of Education, in the fourth and fifth years after this Act’s enactment, to audit 5 states and 10 LEAs to determine their progress in meeting these requirements. The bill would require annual LEA report cards to include certain information on state and local spending per pupil in schools. The bill would require states to provide the public with annual up-to-date school-by-school listings of per-pupil state and local spending. [The companion measure is S. 701 by Senator Bennet (D-CO).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1294.

The Student Bill of Rights Act (H.R. 1295) (111th H.R. 2451), introduced by Representative Fattah (D-PA) would direct the Secretary of Education to make annual determinations as to whether each state's public school system provides all its students with educational resources to succeed academically and in life. The bill aims to enable students to: (1) acquire knowledge and skills necessary for responsible citizenship; (2) meet challenging academic achievement standards; and (3) compete and succeed in a global economy. The Act would require each system to do so by satisfying certain opportunity to learn indicators for all its schools, including highly effective teachers and equitable instructional resources; providing educational services in local educational agencies (LEAs) that receive funds for disadvantaged students that are, taken as a whole, at least comparable to educational services provided in LEAs not receiving such funds; and complying with any final federal or state court order in any matter concerning the adequacy or equitableness of the system. The Act would authorize sanctions if a system fails to meet the above requirements. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1295.

The Local Taxpayer Relief Act (H.R. 1342) (111th H.R. 2280), introduced by Representative Hirono (D-HI) would reauthorize appropriations for the Impact Aid program (which compensates local educational agencies (LEAs) for the financial burden of federal activities affecting their areas) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and amend the program to alter the formula for determining the payments due LEAs for federal ownership of property when appropriations for a fiscal year are insufficient to provide them with full compensation. The Act alters the formula for determining the payments due LEAs for eligible federally-connected children by allowing for flexible calculations of student counts in circumstances caused by federal activities, including military closures and realignments. The Act alters the formula for determining the construction payments due LEAs that are eligible for other Impact Aid payments by dividing 80% of the construction funds evenly between LEAs impacted by military dependent children and LEAs impacted by children residing on Indian lands, with the remainder reserved for emergency repair and modernization grants to LEAs serving Indian lands or experiencing a specified influx of new students due to federal activities. The Act alters the formula for determining whether a state's plan for equalizing assistance to its LEAs will except it from the prohibition on state aid to LEAs being affected by Impact Aid payments. The Act requires new LEAs applying for Impact Aid to have boundaries established by state law and the authority to tax or receive an imputed local tax.. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1342.

The Josh Miller Helping Everyone Access Responsive Treatment in Schools (Josh Miller HEARTS) Act of 2011 (H.R. 1377) (111th H.R. 1380), introduced by Representative Sutton (D-OH) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to direct the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) purchase automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for use in their schools; and/or (2) provide training to meet the grant requirement that at least five adult employees or volunteers at each school where an AED is to be used successfully complete training in its use and in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The Act would require LEAs to reform their emergency response procedures, and would prioritize schools that lack AEDs, are heavily populated, or lack access to emergency services or rural emergency funding. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1377.

The Every Student Counts Act (H.R. 1419) (111th H.R. 1569), introduced by Representative Scott (R-VA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to require states, local educational agencies (LEAs), and secondary schools annually to include on the report cards required under Title I of the Act: (1) their four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate; (2) their cumulative graduation rate; (3) the number and percentage of students graduating in more than four years with a regular secondary school diploma; (4) the number and percentage of students who have been removed from the adjusted cohort; (5) the number and percentage of students from each previous adjusted cohort who remain in secondary school after four years; and (6) the percentage of secondary school students in each grade, except the graduating grade, prepared to advance to the next grade. The Act would also require such data to be disaggregated by race, ethnicity, gender, disability status, migrant status, English proficiency, and status as economically disadvantaged. The Act would allow certain LEAs and schools to provide annual interim graduation rate calculations through the 2010-2011 school year. The Act would require the use of aggregate and disaggregated cumulative graduation rates in determining adequate yearly progress (AYP). The Act would also require states, LEAs, and schools that have a cumulative graduation rate below 90% overall or for any of the student subgroups, to make specified yearly progress in improving such rate or be deemed as failing to make AYP. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1419.

The Diverse Teachers Recruitment Act of 2011(H.R. 1482) (111th H.R. 5096), introduced by Representative Davis (D-CA) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) or nonprofits, educational service agencies, institutions of higher education, or states that enter into partnerships with such LEAs, for recruiting, training, and retaining individuals from underrepresented groups as public elementary and secondary school teachers. The bill gives priority to LEAs that serve the most high-need schools and those that serve schools with the highest percentages of minorities in their student bodies. The bill would require the Secretary to evaluate the success of the grantees and compile a database of best practices for recruiting, training, and retaining individuals from underrepresented groups as public elementary and secondary school teachers. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1482.

The LEAD Act (H.R. 1524) (111th H.R. 5495), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award a competitive grant to a partnership between a nonprofit and an institution of higher education (IHE) to establish a School Leadership Academy that develops and provides evidence-based leadership training to school leaders (turnaround leaders) and their supporting mentors (turnaround mentors) to transform turnaround schools (schools that are subject to corrective action or restructuring or are secondary schools that have a graduation rate below 60%). The bill also requires the Secretary to subsequently award competitive grants to certain non-profit and IHE partnerships with state or local educational agencies to establish Local School Leadership Centers of Excellence that would adapt the program developed by the Academy and work with the Academy to best train and support program participants. The bill would direct the centers to: (1) adopt and adapt the leadership training program developed by the school leadership academy so that such program is informed, on an ongoing basis, by evidence regarding effective school leadership and meets the needs of the local educational agencies they serve; and (2) work with the school leadership academy to best train and support program participants. Additionally, the bill would require the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences to support: (1) research on identifying the skills and conditions necessary for school leaders to improve turnaround schools, and (2) evaluations of this Act's programs and activities. Participants would receive a stipend and agree to serve for at least four years at a turnaround school. [The companion measure is S. 812 by Senator Bennet (D-CA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1524.

The Access to Complete Education Act (H.R. 1531) (111th H.R. 597), introduced by Representative Woolsey (D-CA) would amend Title I of the ESEA to provide grants for core curriculum development in order to strengthen the instruction of music and arts, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, history, geography, and physical education and health as an integral part of the elementary and secondary school curriculum. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1531.

The Success in the Middle Act of 2011 (H.R. 1547) (111th H.R. 3006), introduced by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ) would authorize $1 billion per year for states to carry out a plan that shows what students are required to know and do to successfully complete the middle grades and make the transition to succeed in an academically rigorous high school that prepares students for postsecondary education and the workplace; and would provide $100 million per year to develop or adapt effective practices to turn around low-performing middle schools, and to strengthen research focused on the middle grades. [The companion measure is S. 830 by Senator Whitehouse (D-RI).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1547.

The Strengthen and Unite Communities with Civics Education and English Development Act of 2011, (H.R. 1617) (111th H.R. 3249), introduced by Representative Honda (D-CA) would direct the National Institute for Literacy to disseminate information, and the Secretary of Education award grants to states, regarding integrated English literacy, U.S. history, and civics education programs and study the effectiveness of distance learning or self-study programs for English language learners; would amend the ESEA to replace the term “limited English proficiency” with “English language learners”; would foster adult literacy and create awards programs for exceptional organizations and new citizens. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1617.

The Time for Innovation Matters in Education Act of 2011 (H.R. 1636) (111th H.R. 3130), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ) would provide grants to LEAs and partnerships for expanded learning time and redesigning schools and programs to improve student achievement through longer school days (at least 300 additional hours), additional school days or a combination of longer school days and additional school days, as well as other methods. The bill would require proposed initiatives to expand learning time for all students in all grade levels in participant schools, though on-site prekindergarten programs may be excepted. The bill would also require the Secretary to contract with an independent organization to evaluate the Act’s effectiveness. The bill would further require “evidence of an agreement reached between each participating local educational agency and the exclusive recognized representative of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, for employees to work the expanded learning time schedules involved or, where there is no such representative, evidence of an agreement supported (by at least two-thirds) of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, to work the expanded learning time schedules involved.” [The companion measure is S. 851 by Senator Harkin (D-IA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1636.

The Safe Schools Improvement Act of 2011 (H.R. 1648) (111th H.R. 2262), introduced by Representative Sanchez (D-CA) would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act to include and enhance requirements and prevention programs related to bullying and harassment. [The companion measure is S. 506 by Senator Casey (D-PA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1648.

The To Aid Gifted and High-Ability Learners by Empowering the Nation’s Teachers (TALENT) Act (H.R. 1674) (111th H.R. 2036), introduced by Representative Gallegly (R-CA) would create a part E (Gifted and Talented Students) under Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The Act would require states to: (1) recognize local educational agencies (LEAs) that significantly increase the proportion of their students, overall and in specified student subgroups, that score at or above the advanced level of achievement on such assessments; (2) assist their LEAs and schools in providing additional educational assistance to advanced, gifted, and talented students; and (3) report annually the most recent two-year trend in student achievement for students scoring in the highest 10% on the state assessments in each subject area and grade level. It would further require LEAs receiving school improvement funds to identify gifted and talented students and support their learning needs. The Act would additionally authorize LEAs to use funding under: (1) the small rural school achievement program to support gifted and talented students, and (2) the rural and low-income school program to train teachers to meet the unique learning needs of gifted and talented students. Further, the Act would establish grants to states, or institutions of higher education (IHEs) that partner with other public or private agencies and organizations to assist them in meeting the educational needs of gifted and talented students, including by training school personnel in the identification and education of gifted and talented students. Finally, the Act would help establish a national research center on gifted and talented students. [The companion bill is S. 857 by Senator Grassley (D-IA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1674.

The Asthma Management Plans in School Act, in(H.R. 1692) (111th H.R. 4836), troduced by Representative Hirono (D-HI) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to schools that are receiving school improvement funds under Title I, Part A of the ESEA and are located in areas that have a high prevalence of asthma so they can: (1) develop and implement an asthma management plan; and (2) purchase the asthma inhalers, spacers, and other supplies necessary for the relief and treatment of affected students. The bill would require grantees to: (1) find innovative ways to encourage rapid bidirectional communication between schools and students' physicians and students' adherence to asthma treatment; and (2) ensure that they have on staff a nurse or individual who is trained to administer emergency asthma care. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1692.

The Annual National Classified School Employee of the Year Award Act (H.R. 1704) (111th H.R. 2377), introduced by Representative Woolsey (D-CA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award National Classified School Employees of the Year Awards to public school employees within certain occupational specialties who provide exemplary service to students in pre-kindergarten through higher education. The Act would require the Secretary to choose an awardee each year, out of nominations received from each state, from each of the following occupational specialties: (1) paraprofessionals; (2) clerical and administrative services; (3) transportation services; (4) food and nutrition services; (5) custodial and maintenance services; (6) security services; (7) health and student services; (8) technical services; and (9) skilled trades. [The companion measure is S. 547 by Senator Murray (D-WA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1704.

The Strengthening the Teaching of English in Puerto Rico Act of 2011 (H.R. 1721) (111th H.R. 4668), introduced by Representative Pierluisi (D-PR) would amend Title III, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to increase the maximum federal allotment to Puerto Rico, which is expressed as a percentage of the federal funds allotted to states, to improve the education of limited English proficient children and immigrant youth. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1721.

The Simon Wiesenthal Holocaust Education Act (H.R. 1753) (111th H.R. 2089), introduced by Representative Maloney (D-NY) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to educational organizations to carry out proposed or existing Holocaust education programs. [The companion measure is S. 900 by Senator Menendez (D-NJ).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1753.

The Keep Teachers Teaching Act of 2011 (H.R. 1794) (111th H.R. 1161), introduced by Representative Price (D-NC) would provide grants for innovative teacher retention programs, including professional development; teacher mentoring; advanced certification or advanced credentialing; research, travel, or fellowship opportunities; and pairing of teachers with professionals in research or industry. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1794.

The Statistics Teaching, Aptitude and Training (STAT) Act of 2011(H.R. 1817) (111th H.R. 6355), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA) would amend ESEA to award formula grants to states and, through them, competitive subgrants to eligible partnerships to: (1) establish or enhance teacher training in statistics education; and (2) develop more rigorous statistics education curricula that are aligned with challenging state academic content and achievement standards in statistics, and integrate statistics in the teaching of other courses. An “eligible partnership” is a partnership between a local educational agency (LEA) and one or more of the following: (1) an institution of higher education (IHE); (2) another LEA; (3) a public elementary or secondary school or schools; or (4) a government statistical agency experienced in improving the quality of statistics teachers. The bill would require partnership activities to be consistent with a statistical literacy plan that each state is required to develop and have approved by the Secretary of Education before receiving its formula grant. The bill would authorize the Secretary to award competitive grants to states that lack the resources to develop an adequate plan so that they can do so. The Secretary also would be authorized to award competitive grants to IHEs, governmental statistical agencies, or nonprofit organizations to: (1) develop model state standards and curriculum frameworks for statistics education; (2) disseminate information about proven and tested model statistics education programs that integrate statistics in other studies; (3) develop and implement new policy approaches to advancing statistics education; (4) conduct national statistics education studies; and (5) advance the widespread adoption by states and LEAs of statistics education content standards. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1817.

The Family Engagement in Education Act of 2011 (H.R. 1821) (111th H.R. 5211), introduced by Representative Platts (R-PA) would amend Title I of ESEA to authorize states to reserve school improvement funds for the development and implementation of a statewide family engagement in education plan. The Act would require each state school improvement plan to include a plan for strengthening family engagement in education, and would require each LEA and school receiving school improvement funds to develop policies and practices for family engagement in education that meet specified principles and standards. The bill would specifically address family engagement for neglected or delinquent youth and create a State Family Engagement Coordinating Council and Statewide and Local Family Engagement Centers to assure coordination and integration of family engagement activities across the education spectrum. The bill would also authorize the use of Title II funds to train teachers and principals to effectively engage families in their children's education. To assist implementation, the Act would require the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences to develop recommended metrics on family engagement in education for states and LEAs, and make recommendations on the integration of those metrics into state accountability and longitudinal data systems. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1821.

The 21st Century STEM for Girls and Underrepresented Minorities Act, (H.R. 1903) (111th H.R. 6078), introduced by Representative Woolsey (D-CA) would amend the ESEA to create grants to LEAs to improve the education of girls and underrepresented minorities in STEM and prepare them to pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees and careers in STEM fields. The bill gives priority to LEAs that partner with local, regional, or national entities and requires use of funds for tutoring and mentoring programs, student and teacher attendance at STEM events outside the classroom, after-school and summer programs, purchase of education materials and equipment, paid internships, training of school personnel to facilitate student progress, and other specified uses. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1903.

The Financial and Economic Literacy Improvement Act of 2011 (H.R. 1918) (111th H.R. 1645), introduced by Representative McCarthy (D-NY) would amend the ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award formula matching grants to states or partnerships between states, experienced nonprofit providers of financial and economic literacy education, and experienced nonprofit providers of teacher training in such fields. The Act would require grantees to use 25% of the grant funds to: (1) develop financial and economic literacy standards and assessments for at least three grade levels; (2) create teacher training programs to embed financial and economic literacy education into core academic subjects; and (3) evaluate the impact such education has on students' financial and economic literacy. The Act would foster financial and economic literacy activities in schools and establish a clearinghouse of best practices and materials on the topic. The Act would also amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to direct the Secretary to award competitive grants to institutions of higher education (IHEs) or partnerships between IHEs, experienced nonprofit providers of financial and economic literacy education, and experienced nonprofit providers of teacher training in such fields for activities that increase student knowledge in consumer, economic, and personal financial concepts. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1918.

The Post 9/11 Troops to Teachers Enhancement Act (H.R. 1947) (111th H.R. 3943), introduced by Representative Petri (D-WI) would amend the Troops-to-Teachers program of the ESEA (which provides veterans with teacher certification stipends in exchange for three years of service in a high-need local educational agency [LEA] or public charter school) to expand program eligibility to cover certain individuals: (1) who, on or after September 11, 2001, serve at least 90 continuous days on active duty in the Armed Forces before being honorably released from such service; or (2) who, on or after January 8, 2002, are separated or released from active duty after at least four (currently, six) years of continuous active duty immediately preceding such separation or release, and agree to serve in the Armed Forces Reserves for at least three years. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1947.

The E 2 for Innovation Act (H.R. 1951), introduced by Representative Tonko (D-NY) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award planning grants and matching implementation grants to states to integrate engineering education into kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) instruction and curricula. The bill would require each state that desires an implementation grant to develop quantifiable benchmarks for activities supported by such grants and submit them to the Secretary for approval. The bill requires states to use implementation grants to: (1) establish assessment tools and challenging academic content and achievement standards for engineering education, (2) develop or obtain effective engineering education curricula, (3) develop or improve engineering teacher training programs, and (4) recruit qualified engineering teachers for needy schools. The bill authorizes states to use such grants to: (1) facilitate distance learning and online education in engineering, and (2) invest in after-school engineering education programs. The bill directs the Institute of Education Sciences to support engineering education research and an evaluation of this Act's grant programs, and requires the Secretary to use the evaluation's findings to provide information to the public and technical assistance to states on best practices and promising innovations in K-12 engineering education. [The companion measure is S. 969 by Senator Gillibrand (D-NY).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1951.

The Foreign Language Education Partnership Program Act (H.R. 1966) (111th H.R. 4065), introduced by Representative Holt (D-NJ) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to replace the program providing incentive payments to public elementary schools for foreign language instruction with a partnership program in foreign languages that provides matching incentive payments to partnerships composed of state or local educational agencies and institutions of higher education. The bill would require such partnerships to establish, improve, or expand model programs of foreign language learning from kindergarten through grade 12 that increase the number of high school graduates who attain advanced proficiency in at least one foreign language. The bill would require each model program to have a dimension allowing the student to gain an understanding of the historic, geographic, cultural, economic, and other contextual factors of countries whose people speak the language studied. Continued funding for two additional five-year periods, after an initial four-year funding period, would be based on program effectiveness based on nationally recognized standardized foreign language assessments. [The companion measure is S. 1015 by Senator Lautenberg (D-NJ).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1966.

The Reducing Barriers to Learning Act of 2011 (H.R. 1995) (111th H.R. 3800), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA) would amend the Department of Education Organization Act to create an Office of Specialized Instructional Support Services within the Department of Education to improve specialized instructional support services in schools. The bill amends the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to establish a Reduced Barriers to Learning program authorizing the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to states to: (1) establish or expand specialized instructional support services and programs at the state level that are designed to provide technical assistance, coordination, and support to specialized instructional support services and programs addressing barriers to learning within local educational agencies and individual schools; and (2) hire and support specialized instructional support services coordinators to provide such assistance, coordination, and support. The bill would replace references to pupil services and pupil services personnel with references to specialized instructional support services and specialized instructional support personnel. The bill would define services provided by school counselors, social workers, psychologists, and other qualified professionals that provide assessment, diagnosis, counseling, educational, therapeutic, and other necessary services as part of a comprehensive program to meet student needs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1995.

The Impact Aid Timely Repayment Act of 2011 (H.R. 2094) (111th H.R. 5843), introduced by Representative Larsen (D-WA) would amend title VIII (Impact Aid) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to require the Secretary of Education to complete Impact Aid payments to eligible local educational agencies (LEAs) within three fiscal years of their appropriation. (The Impact Aid program compensates LEAs for the financial burden of federal activities affecting their school districts.) [The companion measure is S. 595 by Senator Murray (D-WA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2094.

The Promise Neighborhoods Act of 2011 (H.R. 2098), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive, matching Promise Neighborhood Partnership grants to nonprofit organizations that partner with a local educational agency (LEA) to implement a comprehensive continuum of supports and services that engage community partners in improving the academic achievement, health and social development, and college and career readiness of children that live in distressed neighborhoods with underperforming schools. The bill would authorize the Secretary to award competitive, matching Promise School grants to LEAs that partner with nonprofit organizations, and Indian or charter schools that partner with nonprofit organizations or institutions of higher education, to implement school-centered strategies and integrated student supports that leverage community partnerships to improve student achievement and development in schools with high concentrations of low-income children. Renewal of grants would be contingent on demonstrated significant success in: (1) ensuring children's school readiness; (2) improving their academic outcomes; (3) increasing their college and career readiness; and (4) improving their health, mental health, and social and emotional well-being. [The companion bill is S. 1004 by Senator Harkin (D-IA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2098.

Great Teaching for Great Schools Act of 2011 (H.R. 2211) (111th H.R. 5218), introduced by Representative Polis (D-CO) would award grants to high-need LEAs to implement high-impact professional development, provide release time for teachers, and assist schools in use of teaching standards, formative assessments, teacher portfolio processes and teacher development protocols. The bill would help prepare and support principals, internal teacher leaders, coaches and content experts as they facilitate school-based professional development. The goal is to establish the school as a professional learning community and align professional development with standards, curriculum, assessments, and instruction. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2211.

The STEM 2 Act (H.R. 2228), introduced by Representative Lujan (D-NM) would amend the ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive planning grants to states, Indian tribes or tribal organizations, nonprofit organizations, or institutions of higher education to develop effective state or tribal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) networks that coordinate STEM education efforts. The bill also would provide grants to entities to carry out a training program, using best practice models and through summer institutes or other professional development enrichment programs, which provides professional development regarding STEM education to STEM teachers (including STEM teachers who are master teachers or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of STEM teaching) and administrators. The bill would also establish a national panel to identify and recommend the most effective STEM curricula models for kindergarten through grade 12. [The companion measure is S. 619 by Senator Udall (D-NM).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2228.

The Student-to-School Nurse Ratio Improvement Act of 2011 (H.R. 2229) (111th H.R. 2730), introduced by Representative McCarthy (D-NY) would provide for demonstration grants to eligible LEAs for the purpose of reducing the student-to-school nurse ratio in public secondary schools, elementary schools, and kindergarten. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2229.

The Innovation Inspiration School Grant Improvement Act (H.R. 2247) (see 111th S. 3732), introduced by Representative Ryan (D-OH) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) promote science, technology, engineering (including robotics), and mathematics (STEM) in secondary schools; (2) support the participation of secondary school students in nontraditional STEM teaching methods; and (3) broaden secondary school students' access to STEM careers. The bill gives priority to grant applications that target: (1) a rural or urban school, (2) a low-performing school or LEA, or (3) an LEA or school that serves students who are eligible for free or reduce price lunches under the school lunch program. [Related measures are S. 716 by Senator Shaheen (D-NH) and H.R. 2253 by Representative Bass (R-NH).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2247.

To establish within the Department of Education the Innovation Inspiration School Grant Program, and for other purposes (H.R. 2253), introduced by Representative Bass (R-NH) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) promote science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in secondary schools; (2) support the participation of secondary school students in nonprofit robotics or STEM competitions; and (3) broaden secondary school students' access to STEM careers. [Related measures are S. 716 by Senator Shaheen (D-NH) and H.R. 2247 by Representative Ryan (D-OH).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2253.

To support the establishment and operation of Teachers Professional Development Institutes (H.R. 2255) (111th H.R. 5556), introduced by Representative DeLauro (D-CT) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to establish and operate Teacher Institutes, i.e., a partnership or joint venture between one or more IHEs and one or more LEAs serving one or more schools with significant low-income populations that is established to improve the quality of teaching and learning through collaborative seminars. [The companion measure is S. 1240 by Senator Lieberman (D-CT).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2255.

The LEARN Act (H.R. 2272), introduced by Representative Yarmuth (D-KY) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to states (and subgrants to LEAs) for comprehensive planning to improve the literacy of children from birth through grade 12. Grant activities would cover birth to 12th grade and prioritize jurisdictions with a significant number or percentage of underperforming schools and high need areas. State activities may include technical assistance to subgrantees, coordinating literacy programs and resources throughout the state, disseminating information on promising literacy programs, and enhancing the credentials of literacy instructors. [The companion bill is H.R. 929 by Senator Murray (D-WA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2272.

The Innovation in Education Act of 2011 (H.R. 2326), introduced by Representative Davis (D-CA) would amend the ESEA to require the Secretary of Education to establish and maintain a National Education Innovation Network of searchable databases or Internet websites that: (1) provide educators and administrators with information regarding the most promising practices and strategies for improving student achievement and turning around low-performing schools; and (2) allow educators and administrators to nominate new practices and strategies for inclusion in such databases or websites, recommend improvements to those already there, and exchange ideas with their peers. The bill would establish a National Education Innovation Corps that connects educators and administrators with evidence-based solutions to the most critical problems of practice in local educational agencies and chronically low-performing schools. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2326.

The Prepare All Kids Act (H.R. 2331) (111th H.R. 2184), introduced by Representative Maloney (D-NY) would amend Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to establish a Prekindergarten Incentive Fund for qualified pre-kindergarten providers to establish, expand, or enhance voluntary high quality full-day pre-kindergarten programs serving children ages three through five. The Act would also provide for early childhood development programs for children ages zero through three and foster extended early childhood day and year programs. [The companion measure is S. 1156 by Senator Casey (D-PA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2331.

The Reengaging Americans in Serious Education By Uniting Programs Act (H.R. 2358) (111th H.R. 3982), introduced by Representative Kildee (D-MI) would direct the Secretary of Labor to award competitive, renewable, five-year grants to eligible partnerships to assist them in providing disadvantaged youth with the support needed to: (1) graduate from secondary school; (2) attain a postsecondary credential, including those offered by institutions of higher education, industry groups, or registered apprenticeship programs; and (3) secure and succeed in a family-supporting career. The bill would require each eligible partnership to include broad array of community representatives and would establish an accountability system to measure performance of each grantee. The bill would provide for evaluation of program and dissemination of best practices. [The companion measure is S. 1279 by Senator Stabenow (D-MI).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2358.

The Families Learning and Understanding English Together Act of 2011, (H.R. 2379) (111th H.R. 1224), introduced by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ) would authorize the Secretary of Education to make grants to providers of family literacy services to improve the literacy and English skills of limited English proficient individuals who are parents or children in families where each parent is at least 16 years old and where at least one child is under age 8. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2379.

To amend the percentage of funds appropriated under title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 required to be reserved for outlying areas and the Secretary of the Interior (H.R. 2430), introduced by Representative Sablan (D-MP) would amend Title I of ESEA to alter the percentage of school improvement funds that are reserved for outlying areas and Indian education. The bill would reserve 0.5% of those funds for outlying areas and 0.75% for Indian education. (Currently, 1% of those funds are reserved for outlying areas and Indian education.) See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2430.

The Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning Act of 2011 (H.R. 2437) (111th 4223), introduced by Rep Biggert (R-IL) would amend Title II of ESEA to include teacher and principal training in practices that address the social and emotional development needs of students as part of the Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund program. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2437.

The 21st Century Readiness Act (H.R. 2536), introduced by Representative Petri (R-WI) would amend the ESEA to support 21st century readiness initiatives that fuse core academic subject knowledge and higher-order thinking skills (such as critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity, and innovation) to ensure that students are prepared for postsecondary education and careers upon graduation from secondary school. The bill would amend Title I to require the Secretary to examine the extent to which programs and initiatives improve student readiness for postsecondary education and careers. The bill would amend Title II to require high-quality professional development programs to incorporate an aligned system of teaching and learning that includes 21st century skills, standards, curriculum, instruction, and assessments. The bill amends Title IV (21st Century Schools) to include 21st century readiness initiatives in 21st Century Community Learning Center activities. The bill would amend Title VI to allow assessment grants to be used by states to develop or improve assessments that use technology to measure core academic subject knowledge and higher-order thinking skills. [The companion measure is S.1175 by S. Hagan (D-NC).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2536.

The No Child Left Inside Act (H.R. 2547) (111th H.R. 2054) introduced by Rep Sarbanes (D-MD) would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to offer state grants to develop environmental literacy plans for pre-kindergarten through grade 12 that include environmental education standards, teacher training, and the development of more rigorous environmental education curricula. The Act would authorize the Secretary to award competitive matching grants to partnerships to improve and support environmental education by advancing content and achievement standards, developing or disseminating innovations or model programs, and conducting research. [The companion measure is S.1372 by S. Reed (D-RI).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2547. The WE CARE Act (H.R. 2565) (111th H.R. 6356), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA) would amend Title I of ESEA to require states and local educational agencies (LEAs) to assess the nonacademic factors affecting student academic performance and work with other public, private, nonprofit, and community-based entities to address those factors. The bill would require the annual report cards issued by states and LEAs to include additional performance data, including information on their efforts to increase community and parental involvement in students’ education. The bill establishes a new program requiring the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to LEAs for the development and implementation of community involvement policies that leverage the resources, services, and opportunities available from public, private, nonprofit, and community-based partners to address students' academic and nonacademic needs and thereby support their attainment of state academic performance standards. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2565.

The STEM Master Teacher Corps Act (H.R. 2598), introduced by Representative Bishop (D-NY) would amend the ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to consortia of local educational agencies (LEAs) or states, acting in partnership with institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations to establish a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Master Teacher Corps program. The bill would requires grantees to: (1) select exemplary elementary and secondary school STEM teachers for membership in the STEM Master Teacher Corps; (2) provide those teachers with compensation that supplements their base salaries for taking on additional duties and leadership roles, with higher compensation going to those teaching at high-need public schools; (3) provide, and track the effectiveness of, research-based training for Corps members; (4) provide discretionary resources for Corps members at high-need schools to use; (5) help coordinate instructional leadership and mentoring roles for Corps members; and (6) facilitate efforts by Corps members to inform STEM education policy at the national, state, and local levels. The bill gives grant priority to applicants that intend to include: (1) large numbers of teachers in the STEM Master Teacher Corps; and (2) rural schools, particularly high-need rural schools, in the area they serve. The bill requires grantees to ensure that at least 75% of their STEM Master Teacher Corps are teachers at high-need schools. The bill directs the Secretary, acting through the Director of the Institute of Education Sciences, to: (1) evaluate the STEM Master Teacher Corps program; (2) identify optimal strategies for designing and advancing such program; and (3) identify best practices for developing, supporting, and retaining STEM teachers based on lessons learned from the program. [The companion measure is S.758 by Senator Franken (D-MN).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2598.

The Developing Innovative Partnerships and Learning Opportunities that Motivate Achievement (DIPLOMA) Act (H.R. 2637) (111th H.R. 6229), introduced by Representative Chu (D-CA) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award renewable five-year grants to states and, through them, subgrants to local consortia that include a local educational agency (LEA) and other community partners to: (1) ensure the academic, physical, social, emotional, and civic development of disadvantaged youth; and (2) strengthen their families and communities. The bill would require that each state grantee to develop and implement a state child and youth strategy that assesses children's needs and the assets within the state that can be mobilized, coordinated, and integrated to achieve quantifiable progress toward goals that include ensuring that: (1) children are ready for school; (2) students are engaged and achieving in school; (3) students are physically, mentally, socially, and emotionally healthy; (4) schools and neighborhoods are safe and provide a positive climate for learning; (5) families are supportive and engaged in their children's education; (6) students are ready for postsecondary education and 21st Century careers; and (7) students are contributing to their communities. [The companion measure is S. 426 by S. Sanders (D-VT).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2637.

The P.E. for the 21st Century Act (H.R. 2684) (111th H.R. 5946), introduced by Representative Boswell (D-IA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to local educational agencies and charter schools to improve physical fitness education and curricula in elementary and secondary schools through technology, partnerships with local businesses, and incorporation of physical fitness education into multiple areas of the curriculum. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2684.

The SAFE Teen Act (H.R. 2689), introduced by Gwen Moore (D-WI) would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (Title IV of ESEA) to combat dating violence, sexual violence, and emotional abuse among students ages 11-19. Steps would include: 1) instructing the Secretary to collect data on the incidence and relevant emotional indicators of dating violence, sexual violence, and emotional abuse, and; 2) demanding that applications for Safe Schools/Healthy Students grants assess the presence of such relationship problems and describe plans to address them. States would also be obliged to provide technical assistance to both LEAs and schools responding to incidents of dating violence. The bill would establish an "Innovation Fund" to replicate, refine, and test model strategies and projects to prevent and respond to dating violence for youth. [The companion measure is S. 1447 by Senator Crapo (R-ID).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2689.

The Keeping PACE Act (H.R. 2691) (111th H.R. 3343), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ) would amend Title V of the ESEA to encourage and support parent, family and community involvement in schools, and to provide needed integrated services and comprehensive supports to children in order to help students stay in school, become successful learners and improve academic achievement. [The companion bill is S. 1462 by Senator Mikulski (D-MD).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2691.

 

The Continuum of Learning Act of 2011 (H.R. 2794), introduced by Representative Hirono (D-HI) would amend Titles I and II of the ESEA to foster a continuum of developmentally appropriate and effective learning to connect the early years of childhood education to K-12 education. The bill would require the inclusion of early learning guidelines and standards in state plans and ready school needs reviews by LEAs as part of Title I. The bill would require more rigorous early learning requirements in licensing, certification and professional development as part of Title II. The bill contains a section prohibiting the use of assessments of young children for high-stakes purposes. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2794.

Promoting Health as Youth Skills In Classrooms And Life Act (H.R. 2816) (see 111th S. 3683), introduced by Representative Fudge (D-OH) would amend the Department of Education Organization Act to establish an Office of Safe and Healthy Students in the Department of Education to assume the responsibilities of the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools and expand such responsibilities to broader health and physical education issues. The bill would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to include health education and physical education in the definition of "core academic subjects." The bill would require each state to determine the most feasible measure for assessing students in health education and physical education, including through adaptive assessments, to measure student knowledge and performance against state standards. The bill would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to, and enter into contracts with, local educational agencies (LEAs), community-based organizations, and nonprofit organizations to initiate, expand, and improve health education programs for students in kindergarten through grade 12, especially in rural areas. The bill authorizes appropriations for FY2012-FY2016 for the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, which provides matching grants to LEAs and community-based organizations to initiate, expand, and improve physical education programs (including after-school programs) for students in kindergarten through grade 12. [The companion bill is S.392 by Senator Udall (D-NM).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2816.

The National Jazz Preservation and Education Act of 2011 (H.R. 2823), introduced by Representative Conyers (D-MI) would amend Title V of the ESEA to promote jazz education in schools and a Ambassadors of Jazz program to promote jazz abroad. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2823.

The School Athletic Facilities Restoration Act of 2011 (H.R. 2869), introduced by Representative Fudge (D-OH) would amend Title V of the ESEA to authorize the Secretary of Education to make grants to local educational agencies for the construction, renovation, or repair of athletics facilities. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2869.

The Equal Access to Quality Education Act of 2011(H.R. 2902), introduced by Representative Chu (D-CA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive matching grants to partnerships between high-need local educational agencies (LEAs) and institutions of higher education (IHEs) to: (1) establish or support teacher preparation programs, and (2) establish or support teacher induction and retention programs. The bill would require the teacher preparation programs to: (1) require participants to complete at least one year of residency followed introduced by at least three years of teaching at the LEA's high-need schools, and (2) award participants a teaching credential or degree that meets state requirements for a teaching license or certification upon their completion of the program. The bill would require the teacher induction and retention programs to provide teachers with: (1) high-quality professional development; (2) updated information on developments in curricula, assessments, and educational research; (3) a mentor teacher and other support if they are new teachers; and (4) leadership opportunities. The bill would give grant priority to partnerships that: (1) have a plan to recruit teachers from among minority and local candidates and the disabled; (2) use a valid and reliable teacher performance assessment; or (3) include an IHE eligible to participate in the TEACH Grant program, a Tribal College or University, an Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-serving institution, an Hispanic-serving institution, or an historically Black college and university. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2902.

The Providing Resources to Improve Dual Language Education (PRIDE) Act of 2011 (H.R. 2906), introduced by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award up to five grants to partnerships of local educational agencies (LEAs), early childhood education programs, and technical assistance providers for the implementation of dual language demonstration programs designed to enhance and assess the biliteracy and bilingualism skills of low-income minority and limited English proficient children from preschool through grade five. The bill would direct the Secretary to: (1) arrange for an entity that has dual language program experience to provide technical assistance to LEA grantees and evaluate the programs funded introduced by this Act, and (2) disseminate information on model practices implemented under such programs that are appropriate for use introduced by early childhood education providers to improve the school readiness of limited English proficient children. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2906.

The Fix America's Schools Today (FAST) Act of 2011 ( H.R. 2948), introduced by Representative DeLauro (D-CT) would direct the Secretary of Education to allocate grants to states and, through them, subgrants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to modernize, renovate, or repair early learning or elementary or secondary education facilities. The bill would require the Secretary to allocate grants directly to the 100 LEAs with the largest numbers of children aged 5-17 living in poverty to modernize, renovate, or repair such facilities. The bill prohibits the use of such grants for new construction, routine janitorial costs, or on facilities used for events for which the public is charged admission. The bill would also direct the Secretary to allocate grants to states to modernize, renovate, or repair existing facilities at community colleges. [The companion bill is S. 1597 introduced by Senator Brown (D-OH).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2948.

The National Parents Corps Act of 2011 (H.R. 3055) (111th H.R. 3075), introduced by Representative Lewis (D-GA) would establish a National Parents Corps Program under the oversight of a nonprofit to foster parent leaders who would work with eligible schools to reduce violence, gangs, and tobacco and alcohol abuse. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3055.

The Education for Tomorrow's Jobs Act (H.R. 3154), introduced by Representative Thompson (R-PA) would amend Title I Part A of the ESEA to require local educational agencies receiving subgrants to describe how they will establish and carry out a school improvement program, including how they will create a network of schools or programs of study that integrate a rigorous curriculum emphasizing college and career readiness and wraparound support services; use school-level strategies to personalize students' educational experience; demonstrate their capacity to implement and sustain their program; involve institutions of higher education, employers, community-based organizations, parent organizations, and other stakeholders in the school improvement process; provide school staff and other stakeholders with high-quality training and technical assistance; facilitate student transitions from secondary schools that do not award diplomas to secondary schools that do, and from the latter to postsecondary education; enable their program through policies that may include budgeting, governance, curriculum, and scheduling autonomies; place students, when possible, in a school or program of study that the student or their parents choose; ensure that students are able to fully participate in their school or program of study and are not placed in a school or program of study on the basis of their prior academic achievement or status as a poor, minority, disabled, or limited English proficient student; and arrange for an ongoing and rigorous evaluation of their program, and disseminate best practices. [The companion bill is S. 1686 introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3154.

The Positive Behavior for Safe and Effective Schools Act (H.R. 3165) (111th H.R. 2597), introduced by Representative Davis, D. (D-IL) would amend ESEA to allow states to allocate school improvement funds under Title I of the ESEA for coordinated, early intervention services for all students, including schoolwide positive behavior supports, defined as a systematic approach to embed proven practices for early intervention services in order to achieve important social outcomes and increase student learning while preventing problem behaviors. The Act would call for technical assistance, flexible use of funds to enhance schoolwide programs in low-income schools, professional development, and school counseling programs. The Act would require the Department of Education to oversee the adequate evaluation of the provision of specialized instructional support services in schools introduced by school counselors, social workers, psychologists, and other qualified professionals. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3165.

The Student Support Act (H.R. 3169) (111th H.R. 1338), introduced by Representative Lee (D-CA) would amend the ESEA to require the Secretary of Education to make matching grants of at least $1 million to states for allocation to local educational agencies (LEAs) so that additional school-based mental health and student service providers may be hired, thereby reducing the student-to-provider ratios in elementary and secondary schools to specified levels recommended introduced by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. The providers include school counselors, school psychologists or other psychologists, child or adolescent psychiatrists, and school social workers among such providers. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3169.

The School and Local Educational Agency Resources Efficiency Act (H.R. 3175), introduced by Representative Young (R-AK) would amend the ESEA to suspend, beginning in the 2011-2012 school year, new identifications of schools or local educational agencies as needing restructuring for failing to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) toward state academic performance standards. The bill would lift such suspension on the earlier of the last day of the 2012-2013 school year or the reauthorization of the ESEA. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3175.

The Supporting State Systems of Early Learning Act (H.R. 3322), introduced by Representative Himes (D-CT) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive, matching Quality Pathways grants to states that demonstrate the greatest progress toward establishing a high-quality system of early learning that includes: (1) state early learning standards; (2) preservice and ongoing training for staff; (3) the systematic review, rating, and monitoring of early learning programs for ameliorative purposes; (4) parental involvement; (5) health, disability, and family support services and referrals for participating children; (6) an early learning data system; and (7) a process for evaluating children's school readiness and ensuring their effective transition to the public school system. The bill would require the grant to be used to further such progress and move more disadvantaged children into higher quality programs. The bill also provides for competitive Development grants to states that were not awarded a Pathways grant, but commit to developing a high-quality system of early learning that includes the components listed above. The bill does require states to establish a process for evaluating school readiness in children that reflects all of the major domains of development, and that (i) is used to guide practice and improve State early learning programs; and (ii) includes multiple measures of school readiness at kindergarten entry, and which shall reflect a sample across the State; however, the bill also states that funds may not be used for any of the following: (1) assessments that provide rewards or sanctions for individual children or teachers; (2) a single assessment used as the primary or sole method for assessing program effectiveness; or 3) evaluating children other than for (A) improving instruction or classroom environment; (B) targeting professional development; (C) determining the need for health, mental health, disability, or family support services; (D) informing the quality improvement process at the State level; (E) program evaluation for the purposes of program improvement and parent information; (F) research conducted as part of the national evaluation described under section 5 of the bill; or (G) assessing children's level of readiness for school success across a broad range of domains of learning and development, including physical well-being and motor development, social and emotional development, approaches toward learning, language development, and cognition and general knowledge. [The companion bill is S. 470 introduced by Senator Casey (D-PA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3322.

The Real Education for Healthy Youth Act of 2011(H.R. 3324), introduced by Representative Lee (D-CA) would foster comprehensive, evidence-based sex education in public schools and provide for the reduction of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and the promotion of healthy relationships. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3324.

The STEM Education Innovation Act (H.R. 3373), introduced by Representative Honda (D-CA) would establish the Office of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education within the Department of Education to administer STEM education, direct the Office of STEM Education to conduct an independent evaluation of the Department's STEM Education programs at least once every five years, and establish an Education Innovation Project within the Department to pursue breakthrough research and development in educational technology, and facilitate the effective use of that technology to improve student achievement. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3373.

A bill to increase the recruitment and retention of school counselors, school social workers and school psychologists introduced by low-income local educational agencies (H.R. 3405) (111th H 1361), introduced by Representative Towns (D-NY) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive, renewable, five-year grants to partnerships between low-income local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools offering graduate programs in school counseling, social work, or psychology, to increase the number of program graduates employed introduced by low-income LEAs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3405.

The Learn to Earn Act of 2011 (H.R. 3445), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA) would direct the Secretary of Education to designate a local educational agency (LEA) as an entrepreneurship community if it is carrying out a high-quality entrepreneurship education program for secondary school students; provide that the entrepreneurship community receive priority in Department of Education competitive grant programs; and direct several agencies to give priority to entrepreneurship partner entities (local business, community organization, SBA office, chamber of commerce, or state, local or tribal entity) when awarding competitive grants, loans, or loan guarantees related to small business, workforce, community, or economic development. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3445.

Sandra Day O'Connor Civic Learning Act of 2011 (H.R. 3464), introduced by Representative Honda (D-CA) would express the sense of Congress that the Commissioner for Education Statistics, in administering the National Assessment of Educational Progress, should increase the number of students tested to improve disaggregation and analysis of data regarding progress in history and civics; repeal We the People, a Civic Education program; and replace We the People with a program awarding competitive grants to nonprofit educational organizations to develop and implement programs that promote civic learning and engagement through instruction, professional development, and evaluations. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3464.

The Native Culture, Language, and Access for Success in Schools Act (H.R. 3568), introduced by Representative Kildee (D-MI) would amend titles I-V and VII of the ESEA to: 1) facilitate the inclusion of Indian tribes in the school improvement process; 2) enhance teacher and principal training and recruiting for Indian schools; 3) award grants to Indian and educational organizations for Native American language programs; 4) establish a Safe and Healthy Schools for Native American Students program, and; 5) facilitate the participation of Indian tribes in both Indian elementary and secondary education grant programs and fund Native American Language programs. It would also authorize tribes to enter into a cooperative agreement with a state or local educational agency (LEA) to assume the role of the state or LEA with respect to schools on Indian land, and would give Indian schools the same eligibility and consideration for any competitive program under the ESEA as LEAs. The bill would require all ESEA public school assistance programs to reserve 1 percent of their funding to provide Indian schools with the technical expertise and capacity to compete for such assistance. The bill would increase the flow of federal funds to Indian schools; support and ensure the enduring instruction in Indian schools of Native American language, history, and culture, and allocate greater oversight responsibility of Indian schools within the Department of Education. [Related measures are H.R. 3569 introduced by Representative Baca (D-CA), S. 1262 introduced by Senator Akaka (D-HI) and S. 1519 introduced by Senator Udall, T. (D-NM)] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3568.

The Prekindergarten and Early Childhood Education Act of 2011 (H.R. 3469), (111th H.R. 3782) introduced by Representative Norton (D-DC) would amend ESEA to allow local educational agencies (LEAs) that receive funds for 21st Century Community Learning Center activities to use them also for educational activities for children four years of age or younger, if the LEA agrees to phase in, where possible, a prekindergarten program taught introduced by teachers with qualifications equivalent or similar to those teaching other grades in the school involved. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3469.

The 21st Century Green High-Performing Public School Facilities Act (H.R. 3490), introduced by Representative Chandler (D-KY) would require the Secretary of Education to make grants to states for the modernization, renovation, or repair of public schools, including early learning facilities and charter schools, to make them safe, healthy, high-performing, and technologically up-to-date. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3490.

The Native Culture, Language, and Access for Success in Schools Act ( H.R. 3569), introduced by Representative Baca (D-CA) would amend titles I-V and VII of the ESEA to: 1) facilitate the inclusion of Indian tribes in the school improvement process; 2) enhance teacher and principal training and recruiting for Indian schools; 3) award grants to Indian and educational organizations for Native American language programs; 4) establish a Safe and Healthy Schools for Native American Students program, and; 5) facilitate the participation of Indian tribes in both Indian elementary and secondary education grant programs and fund Native American Language programs. It would also authorize tribes to enter into a cooperative agreement with a state or local educational agency (LEA) to assume the role of the state or LEA with respect to schools on Indian land, and would give Indian schools the same eligibility and consideration for any competitive program under the ESEA as LEAs. The bill would require all ESEA public school assistance programs to reserve 1 percent of their funding to provide Indian schools with the technical expertise and capacity to compete for such assistance. The bill would increase the flow of federal funds to Indian schools; support and ensure the enduring instruction in Indian schools of Native American language, history, and culture, and allocate greater oversight responsibility of Indian schools within the Department of Education. [Related measures are H.R. 3568 introduced by Kildee (D-MI), S. 1262 introduced by Senator Akaka (D-HI), and S. 1519 introduced by Udall, T. (D-NM)] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3569.

Note: NEA supports the overall goals of this bill, but seeks assurances that all educators who serve as the “teachers of record” for classrooms of students are fully prepared and qualified.

The SKILLS Act (H.R. 3776) (see 111th H.R. 3928), introduced by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ) would amend part A of Title I of the ESEA to require the inclusion of effective school library programs in school improvement programs. The bill defines an "effective school library program" as one that: (1) is staffed introduced by a state sanctioned school librarian; (2) has up-to-date materials and technology, including broadband; (3) includes regular collaboration between teachers and school librarians concerning school reform efforts; and (4) supports the development of digital literacy skills. The bill would replace the existing program under subpart 4 (Improving Literacy Through School Libraries) of part B of title I of the ESEA with a new program (Improving Literacy and College and Career Readiness Through Effective School Library Programs) awarding competitive three-year grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) that serve students, 20% of whom are impoverished, to develop and enhance effective school library programs. The bill amends Title II of the ESEA to rename part A the Teacher, School Librarian, and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund. The bill requires states and LEAs to use funds under the program to train school librarians, and recruit and retain highly effective school librarians. [The companion measure is S. 1328 introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI)] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3776.

A bill to reauthorize 21st century community learning centers, and for other purposes (H.R. 3821), introduced by Representative Kildee (D-MI) would amend the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program to require Centers to provide: (1) students with activities that are targeted to their academic needs and aligned with the instruction they receive during the school day, and (2) students' families with opportunities for active and meaningful engagement in their children's education; include Indian tribes or organizations among the local public or private entities that are eligible for grants from states to establish the Centers; change the percent of funds states can allot for state activities; prohibit the Secretary or states from giving funding priority to applicants that propose to use the funds to extend the regular school day; reauthorize the program through FY2017; and make other changes. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3821.

A bill to amend section 8007 of ESEA to extend eligibility for emergency and modernization grants to local educational agencies in which at least 10 percent of the property in each such agency is nontaxable due to the presence of the federal government, and for other purposes (H.R. 3896), introduced by Representative Hastings, D. (R-WA) would amend the Impact Aid program of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to make certain LEAs eligible for emergency school repair grants and school modernization grants. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3896.

A bill to amend Title II of ESEA to help close the gaps in principal preparation and provide new principals with the support and tools they need to meet the complex challenges of school leadership (H.R. 4113), introduced by Representative Payne, D. (D-NJ) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to states, local educational agencies, and nonprofit organizations to provide principals who have no more than three years of experience with training that improves their capacity to increase student achievement for all children. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4113.

The School Environment Protection Act (H.R. 4225), introduced by Representative Holt (D-NJ) would amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) to require each local educational agency of a school district to implement an integrated pest management (IPM) program that: (1) applies to school buildings and school grounds, (2) establishes an IPM coordinator within the agency, and (3) follows an IPM plan for addressing school pest problems. It would set guidelines on agency and school use of pesticides that would reduce toxic exposure; require the EPA to establish a National School Integrated Pest Management Advisory Board; and make other changes to protect school environments. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4225.

The Project Ready STEM Act (H.R. 4366), introduced by Representative Fudge (D-OH) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants to national intermediaries and, through them, subgrants to their community-based affiliates to operate after school, summer, and weekend programs that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. The bill would define a “national intermediary” as a national private nonprofit organization that has: (1) a network comprising community-based affiliates in at least 50 urban communities, (2) expertise in overseeing programs to help middle and secondary school students succeed, and (3) operated in at least 25 states continuously for at least 20 years. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.4366.

The Autism Understanding and Training in School Methodologies for Educators Act of 2012 (H.R. 5195), introduced by Representative Moran (D-VA) would authorize the Secretary of Education to carry out a demonstration program to award five-year grants to eligible LEAs for the purposes of:  (1) providing training to teachers, paraprofessionals, and other staff on effective ways to teach, communicate, recognize, support, and interact with children with autism spectrum disorders in the classroom; (2) providing technical assistance on training and post-training support issues; (3) executing strategies for recruiting and retaining skilled personnel; and (4) implementing a program of parental support and involvement in the education of students with such disorders. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.5195.

The Engaging Students Through Service Learning Act of 2012 (H.R. 5436), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA) would amend Title II of ESEA to establish a service learning grant program.  The bill would direct the Secretary of Education to: (1) establish a National Center for K-12 Service Learning; (2) conduct research and evaluation activities; and (3) assist states in developing exemplary service-learning programs.  The bill would also require the Secretary to award grants to states to: (1) support a service-learning specialist who acts as a conduit of information between the state and local level, (2) implement a statewide cascade professional development model and support local service-learning efforts, and (3) award competitive subgrants to LEAs that would use the service-learning model to strengthen the content area disciplines and implement key educational innovations in areas with a high percentage of underperforming youth. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.5436.

The Relief for Educators To Adjust if Necessary (RETAIN) Act of 2012 (H.R. 5546), introduced by Representative Baca (D-CA) would amend part A of Title IV (Flexibility and Accountability) of ESEA to replace the existing program under subpart 2 with a new Funding Flexibility for States and High-Need Local Educational Agencies program.  This program would allow states and high-need LEAs to use funds that they receive under certain ESEA and Education Jobs Fund programs to prevent the layoff or termination of teachers or other staff.  The bill would prohibit transferring the funds to such programs if ESEA requires them to: (1) reserve, allocate, or spend the funds for required activities; (2) provide them to eligible entities; or (3) use them for technical assistance or monitoring. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.5546.

Note:  NEA believes it is critical when offering funding “flexibility” to protect funds dedicated to special populations, such as students served by Title I and IDEA, where the federal government has a specific interest in ensuring equal opportunity.

The Rebuild America Act of 2012 (H.R. 5727), introduced by Representative DeLauro (D-CT) would rebuild the middle class by creating jobs, investing in infrastructure, building opportunity for working families, and restoring balance to the tax code.  In the area of education, the bill would establish grant programs for investment in projects to modernize, renovate, and repair education facilities; would authorize the Secretary of Education to award grants for the development, implementation, and monitoring of comprehensive, statewide professional development to increase the effectiveness of all teachers in the instruction of college and career-ready state standards and the development and use of curriculum that is aligned with such standards; would provide for allotments to states to prevent layoffs of teachers, law enforcement officers, and first responders; and would authorize the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HAS) to award grants to states to increase the availability of high-quality childhood care and education programs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.5727.

The Fostering Success in Education Act of 2012 (H.R. 5868) (111th H.R. 5817), introduced by Representative Lewis, J. (D-GA) would require each state receiving school improvement funds Title I, Part A of ESEA to ensure that its foster care children have the right to: (1) continue attending the school they were in when placed in foster care or before a change in such placement (school of origin), unless it is determined to be in the child's best interest to be immediately enrolled in a different school; (2) immediate enrollment in a new school in their school attendance area; (3) well-maintained school records that are available in a timely manner; (4) equal access to the same education and opportunities as other students attending the school or school district; and (5) free transportation to and from their school.  The bill would include preschool children as beneficiaries of such rights, with respect to preschool programs.  States and agencies would be required to collaborate and come up with an effective compliance system. [Related bill is H.R. 5876 introduced by Representative Davis, D. (D-IL)] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.5868.

The Increasing Education Stability for Children in Foster Care Act of 2012 (H.R. 5876), introduced by Representative Davis, D. (D-IL) would amend the school improvement program under Title I of ESEA to require the annual report cards issued by states to include information on the academic achievement and secondary school graduation rates of foster children and would require LEAs to reserve school improvement funds to serve children in foster care.  The bill would require states to develop and implement a plan to ensure that children that move to a new school attendance area due to being placed in foster care, changing their foster care placement, or leaving foster care: (1) enroll or remain in their school of origin and receive transportation to and from that school, unless it is determined to be in their best interest to attend a different school; (2) are immediately enrolled in a school once it is determined to be in their best interest to attend the school, even if they are unable to produce the records normally required for enrollment; and (3) have their school records maintained and available for immediate transfer to their new school. [Related bill is H.R. 5868 introduced by Representative Lewis, J. (D-NY)] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.5876.

The Grow Your Own Teacher Act of 2012 (H.R. 6230) (111th H.R. 5079), introduced by Representative Israel (D-NY) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to establish a Grow Your Own Teacher grant program.  The bill defines an “eligible entity” as a consortium consisting of an LEA that receives school improvement funds under Title I, Part A and an institution of higher education that offers a state-accredited teacher certificate program.  Grant recipients would be required to: (1) train certain individuals who received a high school diploma from the LEA participating in the consortium to be teachers, including by having them observe and work with a veteran teacher in a classroom for at least a year; (2) employ such individuals in hard-to-staff schools and teaching positions in such LEA, with priority given to teaching positions in mathematics, science, special education, world languages, and English as a second language; and (3) employ such individuals in a manner that reduces the divergence between the racial diversity of teachers and of students.  The bill would authorize the Secretary to forgive the student loans incurred by training program participants. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6230.

Note: NEA supports rigorous preparation and induction programs that provide teacher candidates with sufficient classroom and clinical experience to succeed in high-need schools, as well as continuous mentoring from master or mentor teachers who have been recognized for teaching excellence, especially those who have received National Board or a similar type of certification and have significant experience (e.g. five years).  

The Breath of Fresh Air Act of 2012 (H.R. 6284), introduced by Representative Richardson (D-CA) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to LEAs to purchase nebulizers and/or train school personnel to use nebulizers.  The bill would require LEA grant applicants to demonstrate that for each school using nebulizers: (1) a full-time certified nurse is on staff; (2) trained personnel and other resources necessary for nebulizer use are in place; (3) emergency services personnel are notified of nebulizer locations; (4) nebulizers are integrated into the school’s emergency response procedures; and (5) procedures are in place to notify parents of the availability of nebulizers, and inform them how to provide the school with their child’s prescription asthma medication and authorization to use a nebulizer to assist their child. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6284.

The Instructional Leadership Act of 2012 (H.R. 6376) (111th H.R. 5172), introduced by Representative Sarbanes, J. (D-MD) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to states, LEAs, nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, or partnerships or consortia which include at least one of those entities to develop and implement innovative programs and sites to train school principals in instructional leadership skills.  The bill would require the Secretary to award additional competitive grants to states or partnerships or consortia which include states for pilot programs that evaluate and promote the incorporation of instructional leadership standards into state principal certification or licensure.  The bill would direct the Secretary to establish a definition of “an effective principal” that is based on reports from this Act’s grantees and emphasizes instructional leadership standards.  The bill would require the Secretary to award competitive grants to states and high-need LEAs or partnerships between such LEAs and certain educational entities to develop state-of-the-art principal induction programs that provide new principals a minimum of three years of extensive, high-quality, comprehensive induction into the field of school administration. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6376.

The Constitution and Citizenship Day Act of 2012 (H.R. 6390), introduced by Representative Cummings (D-MD) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to establish a Constitution Day Grant Program awarding competitive grants to local educational agencies and charter schools to commemorate, and enhance educational programs that teach students about, the U.S. Constitution, and their state constitutions. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6390.

The Constitution and Citizenship Day Act of 2012 (H.R. 6390), introduced by Representative Cummings (D-MD) would amend ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to establish a Constitution Day Grant Program awarding competitive grants to local educational agencies and charter schools to commemorate, and enhance educational programs that teach students about, the U.S. Constitution, and their state constitutions. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6390.

The Broadening Opportunities Through Education Act (H.R. 6434,) introduced by Representative Edwards (D-MD) would direct the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants to states that make school attendance compulsory through age 17.  The bill would require states to use their grants to improve their secondary school programs through programs such as: work-based programs that integrate academic and career-based skills; implementing an early warning system to identify and assist struggling students; establishing grade and school transition programs and supports; personalizing the school experience and increasing student engagement through service-learning and experiential, work-based, and other learning opportunities; providing extended-learning opportunities by the school day, week, or year; and increasing student supports through activities such as student advisories, counseling, and one-to-one mentoring. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6434.

The STEM Network Act (H.R. 6517), introduced by Representative Honda (D-CA) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to state-based STEM networks or similar organizations to increase elementary and secondary school students’ achievement in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, particularly in rural and low-income schools. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6517.

The Teachers and First Responders Back to Work Act of 2012 (HR 6561), introduced by Representative Crowley (D-NY) would direct the Secretary of Education to make grants to states to prevent teacher layoffs and support the creation of additional jobs in early childhood, elementary, and secondary public education.  The bill would require a state to reserve 10 percent for awards to state-funded early learning programs and allocate the remaining funds to local educational agencies (LEAs).  The bill would direct the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to award competitive grants to hire, rehire, and retain firefighters and to maintain resources for fire departments, and direct the Attorney General to use grants to hire, rehire, and retain career law enforcement officers.  See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6561.

The Measuring and Evaluating Trends for Reliability, Integrity, and Continued Success (METRICS) Act (H.R. 6703)(111th HR 5024), introduced by Representative Holt (D-NJ) would authorize the Secretary of Education to award competitive grants designed to improve access to and sharing and use of education data to improve student outcomes.  The bill would require states to (1) implement aligned statewide education longitudinal data systems that link students P-20 and workforce data; (2) define policies and procedures for the collection of, access to, and use of education data; (3) protect the privacy, security, and confidentiality of student and educator data; (4) link education data with workforce data; (5) match teachers with teacher preparation and certification information; (6) standardize education data through the use of openly developed common education data standards; and (7) meet federal reporting requirements.  The bill would offer competitive grants to high-need LEAs to develop and implement a comprehensive plan to: (1) provide interested parties and the public with access to student education data in a manner that ensures its integrity and respects student and educator privacy; (2) improve the ability of school leaders to use student data to improve schools and classroom instruction; and (3) improve the ability of teachers effectively to use student data through on-going, sustainable, and high-quality training. [Related bill is S. 1464 by Sen. Blumenthal (D-CT)]   See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6703.

The Cainaan Putuga Wendt Shock of Life Act (H.R. 6714), introduced by Representative Richardson  (D-CA) would direct the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to local educational agencies (LEAs) to: (1) purchase automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for use in secondary schools; and (2) provide training to meet the grant requirement that at least five adult employees or volunteers at each school where an acquired AED is to be used are certified, or will be certified, in the use of AEDs, and in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.  The Act would require LEAs to reform their emergency response procedures, and would prioritize LEAs with schools that lack AEDs, are heavily populated, or have above average wait times for emergency services. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R.6714.


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