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Urge Congress to Support Bills to Improve NCLB




NEA supports the following 145 bills

Senate


Summer Term Education Programs for Upward Performance Act of 2007 (STEP UP Act of 2007) (S. 116),
introduced by Senator Obama (D-IL), would authorize competitive demonstration grants to state educational agencies for eligible students to be summer scholars in summer learning opportunity programs primarily designed to increase the literacy and numeracy of such students. It would provide students with access to summer learning, facilitate the enrollment of students in elementary schools or youth development organizations during the summer, promote collaboration between teachers and youth development professionals in order to bridge gaps between schools and youth programs, and encourage teachers to try new techniques and mentor new colleagues. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 116.

NOTE: Provisions of this bill were included in the America COMPETES Act, H.R. 2272, now Public Law 110-289.

The Early Education Act of 2007 (S. 152), introduced by Senator Boxer (D-CA), would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to establish a program to help states expand the educational system to include at least one year of early education preceding the year a child enters kindergarten. This bill would create a program in at least ten states to provide one year of pre-k early education. The $300 million authorized under this bill would supplement federal, state, and local funds. This bill program would serve approximately 136,000 children. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 152.

The Improving No Child Left Behind (INCLB) Act (S. 348), introduced by Senator Crapo (R-ID), would allow states flexibility to use additional assessment models for measuring student progress and to receive credit under Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) formulas for gains students make, provide states additional flexibility in assessing students with disabilities, implement more accurate and fair assessments of English Language Learners, better target designation of schools as "in need of improvement" by limiting such designation to when the same student group falls short of meeting AYP in the same subject for two years, and provide states with flexibility to offer supplemental education services prior to providing school choice. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 348.

The No Child Left Behind Flexibility and Improvements Act (S. 562), introduced by Senator Collins (R-ME), would amend the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) provisions of NCLB to allow the Secretary to extend the timeline to reach 100 percent proficiency, allow students with disabilities to be assessed for AYP based on their IEPs, allow states to utilize growth models to measure AYP (including progress on closing the achievement gap), allow the use of local assessments in addition to or instead of statewide assessments, limit designating schools as "in need of improvement" only when the same subgroup of students fails to make AYP in the same subject for two or more consecutive years, create additional flexibility for certain teachers to meet the highly qualified rules, and modify the Reading First program. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 562.

The Rural Teacher Retention Act of 2007 (S. 583), introduced by Senator Salazar (D-CO), would create a $50 million per year competitive grant program for up to 10 states to enable them to award salary bonuses to highly qualified teachers who teach, or commit to teach, for at least three academic years in a school served by a rural local educational agency. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 583.

The Pathways for All Students to Succeed Act (S. 611), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA), would authorize $1 billion per year for literacy skills grants and $1 billion per year for mathematics skills grants for middle and high schools in LEAs that are eligible for Title I funds. Grants would be used to hire literacy and math coaches in such schools. It also creates a $2 billion grant program to provide funds for secondary schools to hire academic counselors. In addition, it creates a $500 million grant program for secondary schools identified as "in need of improvement" under NCLB to increase student achievement. Finally, it authorizes $50 million for a grant program to State Education Agencies to improve data systems for assessment and accountability, including collection of graduation rates. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 611.

The Graduate for a Better Future Act (S. 765), introduced by Senator Burr (R-NC), would establish a $500 million per year program of competitive grants to states, educational nonprofit organizations, or partnerships of such entities for their use in providing competitive grants to local educational agencies (LEAS) that have a high school graduation rate of no more than 60 percent in the aggregate or among at least two subgroups consisting of the poor or major racial or ethnic groups. Funds would be used by school districts to implement: (1) a college-preparatory curriculum aligned with rigorous secondary school studies; (2) accelerated remedial programs that allow underperforming students to become proficient in mathematics, reading and language arts, and science and thereby graduate in a timely manner; (3) systems to measure student progress in the core subjects and quickly identify students who are dropout risks; (4) a comprehensive college guidance program; (5) a program offering students opportunities for work-based and experiential learning; (6) a program providing students with access to courses in which they may earn college credit; (7) a program providing each student with an academic teacher advisor with whom the student regularly meets; and (8) a program of teacher professional development and institutional leadership that includes diagnostic and formative assessments. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 765.

The Troops to Teachers Improvement Act of 2007 (S. 769), introduced by Senator Salazar (D-CO) would amend the troops-to-teachers program in ESEA to allow a program participant, if a high-need LEA or public charter school is not located within 50 miles of his or her residence, to teach within an LEA or at a public charter school: (1) experiencing a shortage of highly qualified teachers, especially in science, mathematics, special education, or vocational or technical education; or (2) receiving grant funds because of concentrations of children from low-income families. [Note: this bill is identical to HR 711 by Representative Petri (R-WI).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 769.

The Teaching Fellows for Expanded Learning and After School (T-FELAS) Act of 2007 (S. 778), introduced by Senator Kennedy (D-MA), would amend Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to authorize $50 million in FY 08 (rising to $150 million in FY 2013) for competitive three-year grants to partnerships between local educational agencies and community organizations, institutions of higher education, community learning centers or other entities to recruit, select, train, and support exemplary recent college graduates (Fellows) who: (1) establish, expand, or improve expanded learning initiatives, 21st century community learning center programs, or after-school programs in high-need schools; and (2) provide school-day support to teachers in such schools. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 778.

Improving the Leadership and Effectiveness of Administrators for Districts (I LEAD) Act of 2007 (S. 837), introduced by Senator Clinton (D-NY), would authorize competitive grants to high-need local educational agencies; consortia of high-need local educational agencies; and partnerships of high-need local educational agencies, nonprofit organizations, and institutions of higher education to develop a generation of school leaders who are committed to, and effective in, increasing student achievement and to ensure that all low-income, under-performing schools are led by effective school leaders who are well prepared to foster student success. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 837.

NOTE: The Higher Education Opportunity Act, H.R. 4137, now Public Law 110-315, contains as Title II, Part A, Section 202, Paragraph f, Partnership Grants for the Development of Leadership Programs, which contains elements of this bill.

The Striving Readers Act (S. 958), introduced by Senator Sessions (R-AL), would authorize $1 billion per year for grants to states and districts to create literacy programs specifically for middle and high school students, help states create statewide literacy initiatives for students in grades 4 -12, share data on student progress with parents and the public, and improve teacher training and professional development in literacy so that all students receive high quality instruction. It would help districts and schools create plans to improve literacy for adolescents, develop top-notch assessments, train teachers in every subject area in literacy strategies and use regular data to improve teaching and learning; allow districts and schools to hire and place literacy coaches, train parents to support the literacy development of their child, and connect learning inside the classroom with learning that takes place outside the classroom; require states, districts, and schools to participate in a rigorous evaluation that demonstrates student progress; and require the federal government to complete an overall evaluation of the program to determine its impact on the nation's middle and high schools. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 958.

The National Writing Project Act of 2007 (S. 1015), introduced by Senator Cochran (R-MS), would reauthorize the National Writing Project through a grant of $30 million. The National Writing Project provides teacher training programs in effective approaches and processes for the teaching of writing. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1015.

The Graduation Promise Act (S. 1185), introduced by by Senator Bingaman (D-NM) would 1) create a federal-state-local school reform partnership, focused on transforming the nation's lowest performing high schools; 2) provide $2.5 billion to build capacity for secondary school improvement, and at the same time provide states and local school districts with the resources to ensure that high schools with the greatest challenges receive the support they need to implement research-based interventions; 3) strengthening state improvement systems to identify, differentiate among, and target the level of reform and resources necessary to improve low-performing high schools, while ensuring transparency and accountability. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1185.

The No Child Left Behind Reform Act (NCLBR) (S. 1194), introduced by Senator Dodd (D-CT) would give states flexibility to use additional academic indicators in addition to test scores to measure AYP and allow using test scores in growth models to measure student achievement.  It also would target school choice and supplemental educational services to students in specific subgroups that fall short of AYP targets.  It also provides additional flexibility, particularly for middle school teachers, in meeting the highly qualified teacher requirements, by allowing broad-based social studies and science certifications. Finally it creates a new grant program for states and school districts to improve data systems needed to measure AYP. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1194.

The School Accountability Improvements Act (S. 1236), introduced by Senator Murkowski (R-AK), would allow states to utilize growth models under AYP; allow schools or districts that miss AYP solely due to either the students with disabilities subgroup and/or the ELL subgroup to implement an improvement plan targeted to those groups and alleviate them from the other AYP consequences; reverses the order of supplemental services and school choice, targets both choice and SES to students who are not proficient, and allows districts in need of improvement to be SES providers; provides flexibility for teachers in small schools to meet the highly qualified teacher rules; provides some flexibility in meeting AYP for schools which have students enrolled in Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or America Indian language programs; and improves parental involvement provisions. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1236.

The Keeping Parents and Communities Engaged (Keeping PACE) Act (S. 1302), introduced by Senator Kennedy (D-MA), would amend Title V of ESEA to expand parent and community involvement in schools, and to provide the integrated supports and comprehensive services children need to learn and stay in school. It authorizes $130 million to support Parent and Community Outreach Coordinators in Title I schools, to facilitate the participation of families and communities in the education of their children; $78 million to support community-based organizations (in partnership with schools) to deliver integrated student services designed to close the achievement gap and dramatically reduce the risk of students dropping out of school; and $52 million in incentive grants to encourage the innovative use of schools as joint facilities to deliver, expand, and coordinate services for children and their communities. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1302.

The Teacher Excellence for All Children (TEACH) Act of 2007 (S. 1339), introduced by Senator Kennedy (D-MA), would amend both NCLB and the Higher Education Act to ensure that all children will be taught by high-quality teachers and all teachers will have the supports they need to do their job well. It would provide an additional $3.4 billion to provide financial incentives to encourage teachers to enter and remain in the profession, promote the establishment of teacher career advancement ladders, provide funding for school districts to pay higher salaries to exemplary highly qualified teachers and principals who transfer into the hardest-to-staff schools, and help new teachers transition into the classroom and build their skills through state-of-the-art induction programs. [Note: this bill is identical to HR 2204 by Representative Miller (D-CA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1339.

The Full-Service Community Schools Act of 2007 (S. 1391), introduced by Senator Nelson (D-NE), would authorize $200 million for grants to partnerships between public school districts and community-based organizations to establish full-service community schools that coordinate educational, developmental, family, health, and other comprehensive services to students, families, and the community. Such services could include early childhood education, Head Start, family literacy, child care, primary health and dental services, mental health services, parenting education, nutrition, job training, adult education, and other services. [Note: This bill is identical to HR 2323 by Representative Hoyer (D-MD).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1391.

21st Century Skills Incentive Fund Act (S. 1483), introduced by Senator Rockefeller (D-WV) would authorize a $100 million per year program of grants to states to pay 50 percent of the costs of establishing a statewide 21st Century Skills initiative that demonstrates a commitment to advancing 21st Century Skills within standards and assessments; curriculum; professional development; and the learning environment. To be eligible a State must approved as a 21st Century Partner State by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Partnership for 21st Century Skills. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1483.

The 21st Century Community Learning Centers Act of 2007(S. 1557), introduced by Senator Dodd (D-CT), would reauthorize the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program in ESEA (Title V, Part B) and add as allowable uses physical fitness and wellness programs, and service learning and youth development activities. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1557.

The Teaching Residency Act (S. 1574), introduced by Senator Obama (D-IL), would establish an innovative framework for prospective teachers to partner with mentor teachers for an academic year, receive master's level coursework and certification, and gain hands-on classroom experience, similar to medical residency programs for training health professionals by creating a competitive partnership grant program under Title II of HEA to support Teaching Residency Programs. It would fund programs in high-needs school districts, which would recruit, prepare, and provide ongoing mentoring and induction support through a partnership between a college or university, a school district, non-profit community partners, and other partners. It would also provide a stipend for teachers during their year of preparation, and require them to work in the district upon completion of the program. [Note: This bill is a companion to H.R. 2617 by Representative Emanuel (D-IL).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1574.

NOTE: The Higher Education Opportunity Act, H.R. 4137, now Public Law 110-315, contains major elements of this bill in Title II, Part A.

The Mentoring America's Children Act of 2007 (S. 1812), introduced by Senator Clinton (D-NY), would broaden the reach of the mentoring program in NCLB to include specific populations of young people who could particularly benefit from a mentor's involvement, including children in foster care and kids in communities with a high rate of youth suicides. It also provides training and technical assistance to grantees, tracks youth outcomes, strengthens research on the effects of mentoring, and improves the sustainability of grant recipients. Finally, it allows students to gain professional skills while working with mentors by establishing internship programs during the school year. [Note: This bill is a companion to H.R. 2611 by Representative Davis (D-CA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1812.

The Ready to Learn Act (S. 1823), introduced by Senator Clinton (D-NY) would provide funding for States to establish high-quality early learning programs to promote school readiness for four-year-olds in their State. States will apply for funding through a competitive process to establish and administer voluntary preschool programs. It will allow governors to build on pre-existing early childhood systems. Schools, child care entities, Head Start programs, or other community providers of pre-kindergarten programs are all eligible for funding. To ensure high-quality programs that properly prepare children to be ready to learn, State plans will require qualified teachers, a developmentally, culturally and linguistically appropriate early learning curriculum and support for professional development. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1823.

The No Child Left Behind Enhancement Act (S. 1913), introduced by Senator Crapo (R-ID), would allow states to use growth models for purposes of meeting AYP, change the assessment participation rate from 95% to 90%, clarify that the individualized education program of a disabled student shall specify the appropriate assessment and that the proficient scores of up to 3% of all students who take alternate assessments shall be counted for purposes of meeting AYP. It would also allow local education agencies, on a case-by-case basis depending on individual student need, to provide three years for English language learners to learn the English language and exempt their content test scores from the AYP calculation of a school. ELL students must still participate in all assessments. Finally, the legislation allows schools to target public school choice to those subgroups failing to make AYP, adds provisions to ensure greater oversight of supplemental education services providers, and provides more flexibility for new middle school teachers, as well as special education teachers, in meeting the "highly qualified" requirements. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1913.

The Getting Retention and Diplomas Up Among Today's Enrolled Students (GRADUATES) Act (S. 1920), introduced by Senator Reid (D-NV), would authorize a $500 million program to provide grants to LEAs to develop and implement innovative programs to increase graduation rates and help prepare at-risk students for postsecondary education and the workforce. It would allow strategies such as the creation of career academies, dual enrollment programs, smaller learning communities, alternative education settings, expanded learning time opportunities, and programs that provide greater emphasis on the transition needs of at-risk students as they exit high school and enter college or the workforce. It would require LEAs to determine how to measure and report indicators such as student attendance or participation, credit accumulation rates, core course failure rates, college enrollment and persistence rates, or number or percentage of students taking Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or other postsecondary education courses, rigorous postsecondary education preparatory courses, or workforce apprenticeship and training programs. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1920.

The Public School Repair and Renovation Act of 2007 (S. 1942), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA), would create a $1.6 billion grant program to states to provide funding to local school districts for school renovation and repair. Funding could be used for making urgent repairs to schools, such as roof replacement, remedying fire code violations, repairing or replacing ventilation, heating, and cooling systems, compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, asbestos removal, and charter school infrastructure repairs and renovation. [Note: the House companion to this bill is HR 3021, the 21st Century High-Performing Public School Facilities Act by Rep. Chandler (D-KY).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1942.

The Co-Teaching Educator Professional Development Act of 2007 (S. 1978), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI), would allow the Secretary of Education, under the existing "national activities" funding stream, to award competitive grants to local school districts to promote and enhance co-teaching models of instruction for students with disabilities. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1978.

The School Improvement through Teacher Quality Act of 2007 (S. 1979), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI), would create a new program in Title II geared toward enhancing professional development for school improvement.  The legislation emphasizes high-quality, ongoing professional development, mentoring and induction programs, collaborative planning and instructional strategies, and would target schools most in need of improvement. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1979.

The No Child Left Inside Act of 2007 (S. 1981), introduced by Senator Reed (D-RI), would amend Title II to authorize $100 million per year for grants for states and school districts to integrate environmental education into their K-12 curriculum to ensure that graduates are environmentally literate; develop, improve and advance environmental education standards; and train qualified teachers to teach environmental education courses and programs. [Note: This bill is identical to HR 3036 by Rep. Sarbanes (D-MD).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1981.

The Achievement Through Technology and Innovation (ATTAIN) Act of 2007 (S. 1996), introduced by Senator Bingaman (D-NM), would revamp the Enhancing Education Through Technology program (Title II-D of NCLB) by focusing funds on professional development and systemic reform programs with strong technology components, prioritizing funding to schools in need of improvement, and requiring states to assess whether students have attained technological literacy by the eighth grade. It would strengthen the program's emphasis on teacher quality and technology skills by raising the portion of formula-grants set aside for professional development from 25 percent to 40 percent, while emphasizing the importance of timely and ongoing training. [Note: This bill is identical to HR 2447 by Rep. Roybal-Allard (D-CA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 1996.

S. 2014, introduced by Senator Brown (D-OH), would provide for statewide longitudinal data systems to improve elementary and secondary education. The legislation would authorize a $100 million competitive grant program for states to create or enhance data systems to track student growth on assessments, but also track other measures of student success such as enrollment. [Note: This bill is a companion to HR 3253 the Measuring and Evaluating Trends for Reliability, Integrity and Continued Success Act by Rep. Holt (D-NJ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2014.

The Rural Education Achievement Program Reauthorization Act (S. 2051), introduced by Senator Conrad (D-ND), would strengthen the Rural Education Achievement Program in Title VI of NCLB by allowing districts that are eligible for both programs the opportunity to participate in the Rural and Low Income School Program if they do not receive any financial benefit from the Small and Rural Schools Achievement Program; updating the locale codes used to classify rural schools to be consistent with those developed by the Census Bureau and the National Center for Education Statistics; increasing the minimum and maximum grants under the Small and Rural Schools Achievement Program to $25,000 and $80,000, respectively, when the appropriation for REAP reaches $200 million; and changing the poverty measure from 20 percent of poverty as determined by the Census to 40 percent free and reduced lunch. [Note: this bill is identical to H.R. 3545 by Representative Pomeroy (D- ND).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2051.

The Improving Student Testing Act of 2007 (S. 2053), introduced by Senator Feingold (D-WI), would allow states to use growth models and multiple measures to assess student learning and school success, ending the over-reliance upon two standardized tests given one day out of the year; allow states to return to the pre-NCLB requirement of statewide annual testing once in elementary school, once in middle school, and once in high school; and provide grants to states to significantly improve the quality of their assessments and place far greater emphasis on higher order and critical thinking skills, instead of rote memorization. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2053.

The Teachers at the Table Act (S. 2060), introduced by Senator Feingold (D-WI), would require the Secretary of Education to establish a Volunteer Teacher Advisory Committee to monitor the effects of ESEA, on the ground and in classrooms, with a sole focus on children and families. Members of the Committee would be public school teachers who are past or present Teachers of the Year, with four members each appointed by the Secretary, the Senate Majority Leader, the Senate Minority Leader, the Speaker of the House, and the House Minority Leader. [Note: The similar but not identical House companion is H.R. 2896 by Representative McCarthy (D-NY).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2060.

The Positive Behavior for Effective Schools Act (S. 2111), introduced by Senator Obama (D-IL), would expand the use of early intervening services, particularly school-wide positive behavior supports, to systematically create a school climate that is highly conducive to learning. [Note: The House companion is H.R. 3407 by Representative Hare (D- IL).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2111.

The Education Research & Development to Improve Achievement Act of 2007 (S. 2117), introduced by Sen. Lugar (R-IN), would authorize $750 million over seven years to develop replicable, research-proven activities for core Title I programs.  See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2117.

The Facilitating Outstanding Classrooms Using Size Reduction Act (FOCUS Act) (S. 2122), introduced by Senator Murray (D-WA), would authorize a $2 billion per year program to assist states and local educational agencies in recruiting, hiring, and training 100,000 teachers in order to reduce class sizes nationally, in kindergarten through third grade, to an average of 18 students per regular classroom. [Note: the House companion is H.R. 2668 by Representative Wu (D-OR.] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2122.

The Expanded Education Act (S. 2157), introduced by Senator Sanders (I-VT), would amend Title I of ESEA to add a new program for expanded school day, week, and year education programs. It would authorize $350 million for extended day and week programs and $350 million for extended school year and summer institute programs. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2157.

The Fitness Integrated with Teaching Kids Act (the FIT Kids Act) (S. 2173), introduced by Senator Harkin (D-IA), would amend the required state, school district, and school report cards under ESEA to add reporting on the amount of time students spend in required physical education, the percentage of local educational agencies in the state that have a required, age-appropriate physical education curriculum for all students, the percentage of elementary and secondary school physical education teachers who are state-licensed or -certified, the percentage of schools that have a School Health Council and the number of meetings of the Council, and the amount of square feet of indoor and outdoor facilities that are primarily used for physical education. It would also add as allowable uses of funds for various ESEA programs, including the school counselors and after-school programs, activities to encourage healthy lifestyles including participation in physical education and physical activity, access to nutritious food and nutrition education, and programs that support a healthy, active lifestyle. In addition, it would provide for job-related professional development of physical education and health teachers. [Note: this bill is similar to H.R. 3257 by Representative Kind (D-WI), but does not include the AYP changes in that bill.] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2173.

The Student Bill of Rights (S. 2189), introduced by Senator Dodd (D-CT), would hold states accountable for ensuring that all students receive educational opportunities that enable them to be participating, responsible citizens and to compete and succeed in a global economy. The bill defines such fundamentals as: high-quality teachers and principals; rigorous academic standards, curricula, and methods of instruction; small classes; quality facilities, computers, textbooks and materials; up-to-date libraries; and qualified pupil services personnel. States would have to ensure that all schools have at least adequate access to each fundamental within 12 years. [Note: This bill is identical to H.R. 2373 by Representative Fattah (D-PA).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2189.

S. 2194, introduced by Senator Salazar (D-CO), would establish a partnership between the Department of Education and the National Park Service to provide educational opportunities for students and teachers, including professional development for educators and programs that emphasize science, environment, natural resources, math, civics and history. [Note: This bill is identical to H.R. 3463 by Representative Holt (D-NJ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2194.

The Teachers Professional Development Institutes Act (S. 2212), introduced by Senator Lieberman (D-CT), would amend Title II of ESEA to authorize a total of $30 million to support the establishment and operation of Teachers Institutes for local educational agencies that serve significant low-income student populations to improve student learning; and to enhance the quality of teaching and strengthen the subject matter mastery and the pedagogical skills of current teachers through continuing teacher preparation. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2212.

The Success in the Middle Act of 2007 (S. 2227), introduced by Senator Obama (D-IL), would authorize $1 billion per year for states to carry out a plan that shows what students are required to know and do to successfully complete the middle grades and make the transition to succeed in an academically rigorous high school that prepares students for postsecondary education and the workplace; and would provide $100 million per year to develop or adapt effective practices to turn around low-performing middle schools, and to strengthen research focused on the middle grades. [Note: This bill is identical to H.R. 3406 by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ).] See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2227.

The Enhancing Teaching Standards and License Portability Act of 2007 (S. 2496), introduced by Senator Bingaman (D-NM), would amend Title II of ESEA to improve teacher quality by supporting the development of rigorous kindergarten through grade 12 teaching standards that incorporate 21st century teaching and learning skills; promote alignment of these standards with performance-based teacher assessments; create incentives for states to adopt, pilot, and implement such teaching standards and performance-based teacher assessments through a competitive grants process; promote efforts for states to align these teaching standards and performance-based teacher assessments to state licensing requirements; and to create incentives for States to develop policies that would facilitate license reciprocity and portability. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2496.

The Kindergarten Plus Act of 2008 (S. 2759), introduced by Senator Dodd (D-CT), would create a $1.5 billion per year competitive grant program for states to provide local educational agencies (LEAs) with funds to provide disadvantaged children with additional time in school during the summer before and the summer after the traditional kindergarten school year to help ensure that more children enter school ready to succeed. To be eligible for a grant, states must have in place developmentally appropriate practices, goals for a high quality summer program and a description of how the state will provide professional development for teachers and staff. See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 2759.

The Empowering Teaching and Learning Through Education Portals Act (S. 3184) introduced by Sen. Kerry (D-MA), would authorize $100 million per year for the Secretary of Education to award matching grants to states to implement or maintain education portal initiatives that include collecting and making available: (1) high quality resources (including data, tools, and digital media content) for teachers, students, and parents, that support public education from Head Start through graduate school; and (2) resources for ongoing and sustainable teacher training in the use of education technology at such educational levels. Allows teachers, students, and parents to contribute resources to their state portal, which is to be accessible statewide. Permits states to use funds available to them under part A of Title II of ESEA to maintain such initiatives after their receipt of this Act's funding ends.  See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 3184.

The Increased Student Achievement Through Increased Student Support Act (S. 3364) introduced by Sen. Lincoln (D-AR), would increase the recruitment and retention of school counselors, school social workers, and school psychologists through competitive, renewable, five-year grants to partnerships between low-income local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools offering graduate programs in school counseling, social work, or psychology to increase the number of program graduates employed by low-income LEAs. Allows the use of grant funds to: (1) provide program graduate students with field training at partnership LEA schools; (2) contribute to program graduates' salaries at such schools for up to three years after they graduate; (3) increase the number of school counselors, social workers, and psychologists per student in such schools; (4) enhance the capacity of partnership graduate schools to train such professionals; (5) develop course work designed to facilitate such graduates' service to low-income LEAs and at-risk students; and (6) provide tuition credits to such graduate students and student loan forgiveness to program graduates employed as school counselors, social workers, or psychologists by low-income LEAs for at least five years. It also directs the Secretary to establish a program providing student loan forgiveness to non-participants in this Act's grant program who have been employed for at least five years as school counselors, social workers, or psychologists by low-income LEAs. [Note: this bill is identical to HR 6654 by Rep. Towns (D-NY).]  See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 3364.

The Time for Innovation Matters in Education Act of 2008 (S. 3431) introduced by Sen. Kennedy (D-MA), would authorize a total, of $2.1 billion over five years for grants for expanded learning time initiatives, including expanded school days, expanded school weeks, or expanded school years, in order to increase student academic achievement and student engagement and success in schools. Grants would be used to provide students with more in-depth and rigorous learning opportunities in reading or language arts, mathematics, science, and other core academic subjects;  more time for additional subjects and enrichment activities that contribute to a well-rounded education, which may include music and the arts, physical education, drama, service-learning, and experiential and work-based learning opportunities (such as community service, learning apprenticeships, internships, and job shadowing); and teachers with increased opportunities to work collaboratively and to participate in professional planning to improve instruction. It requires that each school district receiving a planning grant must “negotiate and reach an agreement with the exclusive recognized representatives of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency or, where there is no such representative, with the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency.”   Districts receiving implementation grants must “provide evidence of an agreement reached between each participating local educational agency and the exclusive recognized representatives of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, for employees to work the expanded learning time schedules involved or, where there is no such representative, evidence of an agreement supported by at least two-thirds of the employees of each participating high-need school served by the agency, to work the expanded learning time schedules involved.” [Note: This bill is similar to HR 3642, the Expanded Learning Time Demonstration Act by Rep. Payne (D-NJ).]  See if your Senator is a cosponsor of S. 3431.

House

Eating Disorders Awareness, Prevention, and Education Act of 2007 (H.R. 88), introduced by Representative Biggert (R-IL), would amend Title V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act by making as an allowable use of funds programs to improve the identification of students with eating disorders, increase awareness of such disorders among parents and students, and train educators on effective eating disorder prevention and assistance methods, as well as mandate a study on the impact eating disorders have on educational advancement and achievement. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 88.

The Student Support Act (H.R. 171), introduced by Representative Lee (D-CA), would authorize $100 million per year for grants to states for assistance in hiring additional school-based mental health and student service providers. It would reduce the ratios of school-based mental health and student service providers to students in elementary and secondary schools to the minimum ratios recommended by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, provide school-based mental health and student services, remove emotional, behavioral, and psychosocial barriers to learning, and support school staff and teachers in improving classroom management by conducting behavioral intervention. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 171.

H.R. 209, introduced by Representative Serrano (D-NY), would authorize $1 billion per year to recruit, hire, and train 100,000 new classroom paraprofessionals in order to improve educational achievement for children. Up to 25 percent of the funds would be used to provide professional development to paraprofessionals. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 209.

The National Board-Certified Teachers in Low-Performing Schools Act of 2007 (H.R. 280), introduced by Representative Davis (D-CA), would establish a pilot program to encourage certification of teachers in low-income, low-performing public elementary and secondary schools by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The Secretary of Education would establish a five-year pilot program under which board-certified teachers in low-income, low-performing schools receive $5,000 yearly stipends. The Secretary may provide stipends for up to 500 teachers annually. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 280.

The Keep Our Promises to America's Children and Teachers (PACT) Act (H.R. 627), introduced by Representative Van Hollen (D-MD), would require full funding of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Act. It provides the financial amounts necessary to fully fund the ESEA/NCLB programs though the 2014 fiscal year, and provides mandatory full funding for IDEA. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 627.

No Child Left Behind Improvements Act of 2007 (H.R. 648), introduced by Representative Young (R-AK), would make numerous changes to the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and assessment requirements, including allowing growth to be included in AYP, allowing states flexibility to develop alternate methods to measure AYP, lowering the test participation rate from 95 percent to 90 percent, better linking the use of alternate assessments for students with disabilities to their IEPs, limiting designating a school as "in need of improvement" only when the same subgroup of students fails in the same subject for at least two consecutive years, limiting the school choice and supplemental education service (SES) requirements to students in the subgroup that failed AYP, allowing school districts that are in need of improvement to continue to be SES providers, strengthening the role of school districts in SES, allowing states to offer SES prior to school choice, and limiting the implementation of certain sanctions unless Title I funding increases by at least $2.5 billion over the previous year. In addition, it would extend the testing requirements to private schools whose students receive services under NCLB. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 648.

Keeping Our Promises to America's Children Act of 2007 (H.R. 684), introduced by Representative Moore (D-KS), would allow states or school districts to suspend, modify or defer any of the sanctions for failing to meet AYP in any year in which Title I is not funded at its authorized level. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 684.

The Troops to Teachers Improvement Act of 2007 (H.R. 711), introduced by Representative Petri (R-WI), would amend the troops-to-teachers program in ESEA to allow a program participant, if a high-need LEA or public charter school is not located within 50 miles of his or her residence, to teach within an LEA or at a public charter school: (1) experiencing a shortage of highly qualified teachers, especially in science, mathematics, special education, or vocational or technical education; or (2) receiving grant funds because of concentrations of children from low-income families. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 711.

Graduation Really Achieves Dreams Act (GRAD Act) (H.R. 887), introduced by Representative McCarthy (D-NY), would provide $27 million for Project GRAD programs implementing integrated education reform services to improve secondary school graduation rates and college attendance for disadvantaged students. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 887.

NOTE: A version of this bill was incorporated as Title VII, Part A, Sec. 801 of the Higher Education Opportunity Act, HR 4137, now Public Law 110-315.

The High School Athletics Accountability Act of 2007 (H.R. 901), introduced by Representative Slaughter (D-NY), directs coeducational elementary and secondary schools, if they participate in any ESEA program, to: (1) annually report certain information on equality in their school athletic programs to the Commissioner for Educational Statistics; and (2) make such information available to their students and potential students, upon request, and to the public. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 901.

Investment in Quality School Leadership Act (H.R. 1156), introduced by Representative Lowey (D-NY), would provide $100 million per year in grants to eligible consortia to provide professional development to superintendents, principals, and prospective superintendents and principals. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1156.

The Rural Education Equality and Improvement Act of 2007 (H.R. 1166), introduced by Representative Marshall (D-GA), would expand the definition of rural school districts that can utilize flexibility provided by the Department of Education in meeting the "highly qualified" teacher requirements and other provisions of NCLB. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1166.

The Student Achievement and Successful School Act of 2007 (H.R. 1169), introduced by Representative McCollum (D-MN), would allow states (subject to approval by the Secretary of Education) to utilize alternative definitions of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) including longitudinal measures, extend the current deadline for reaching 100 percent proficiency by four years until the end of the 2017-18 school year, allow states to proportionately count scores of students who are in more than one subgroup so that such students' scores are not counted as more than one whole score, allow school districts in school improvement to be supplemental education service (SES) providers, require SES providers to only use highly qualified teachers, provide funds for paraprofessional training, allow states and school districts to defer some sanctions for failure to meet AYP until both Title I and IDEA are funded at their authorized levels, and direct GAO to do a study of the costs of NCLB. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1169.

The Student Privacy Protection Act of 2005 (H.R. 1346), introduced by Representative Honda (D-CA), would amend NCLB so that a parent must provide written consent for the release of student directory information to military recruiters instead of the current requirement that school districts provide student directory information to military recruiters unless the parent or the student affirmatively opts out of the release of such information. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1346.

The Graduation for All Act (H.R. 1623), introduced by Representative Hinojosa (D-TX), would amend the graduation provisions of AYP to require that such information count separately for each designated subgroup of students, that such information be reported on the required school report cards, as well as revise the definition of graduation rates. In addition, it creates a new $1 billion grant program to improve adolescent literacy in middle and high schools. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1623.

The Flexibility in Assessments for Individuals Reform (FAIR) Act of 2007 (H.R. 1711),  introduced by Representative Hooley (D-OR), would allow states to utilize a longitudinal growth model in addition to or instead of the current AYP status model, allow parents to opt their child out of taking the assessments required under NCLB for certain reasons, include "exited" LEP students in the LEP subgroup for AYP purposes for three years after they become proficient in English, and extend from three to five years the period in which LEP students may be tested in their native language. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1711.

The Families Learning and Understanding English Together Act of 2007 (H.R. 1794), introduced by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ), would authorize $50 million per year in grants to family literacy providers to provide family literacy services designed for families with limited-English-proficient individuals. Such services would include: interactive literacy activities between parents and their children; training for parents regarding how to be the primary teacher for their children and full partners in the education of their children; parent literacy training that leads to economic self-sufficiency; and an age-appropriate education to prepare children for success in school and life experiences. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1794.

The Teaching Fellows Act of 2007 (H.R. 1828) introduced by Representative Price (D-NC), would establish a national teaching fellowship program to encourage individuals to enter and remain in the field of teaching at public schools. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1828.

The Reading First Improvement Act (H.R. 1939), introduced by Representative McKeon (R-CA) would add provisions of the Reading First program to guard against conflicts of interest by members of peer review panels and contractors who receive grants, as well as reinforce provisions found in NCLB and other federal laws that prohibit the Department of Education from dictating curriculum to local schools. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 1939.

The Comprehensive Learning Assessment for Students and Schools (CLASS) Act (H.R. 2070), introduced by Representative Udall (D-CO), would make numerous improvements to the assessment and Adequate Yearly Progress provisions of NCLB by requiring accountability provisions to include multiple measures of student achievement; giving credit to schools for improving student achievement on all parts of the achievement scale, including growth over time; limiting designating a school as "in need of improvement" only when the same subgroup of students fails AYP in the same subject for two or more consecutive years; utilizing more accurate and equitable methods to assess academic achievement of students with disabilities and English Language Learners; and targeting school choice and supplemental services to students in the specific subgroups that fail to make AYP.  See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2070.

The No Child Left Behind Reform Act (NCLBR) (H.R. 2087), introduced by Representative DeLauro (D-CT), would give states flexibility to use additional academic indicators in addition to test scores to measure AYP and allow using test scores in growth models to measure student achievement. It also would target school choice and supplemental educational services to students in specific subgroups that fall short of AYP targets. It also provides additional flexibility, particularly for middle school teachers, in meeting the highly qualified teacher requirements, by allowing broad-based social studies and science certifications. Finally it creates a new grant program for states and school districts to improve data systems needed to measure AYP. [Note: This bill is identical to S.1194 by Representative Dodd (D-CT).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2087.

The Foreign Language Education Partnership Program Act (H.R. 2111), introduced by Representative Holt (D-NJ), would create a new program under Title V of ESEA that authorizes $50 million in grants to partnerships of public school districts and institutions of higher education for developing and maintaining model programs of articulated foreign language learning from kindergarten through grade 12 that increase the number of American students graduating from high school with an advanced level of proficiency in at least one foreign language. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2111.

The Practicality in Education Act (H.R. 2166), introduced by Representative Moran (R-KS), would provide schools with two years of teaching LEP students before including their math or reading test results in AYP calculations unless those students are tested in their native language, provide for use of growth models to determine AYP, assess students with disabilities at the grade level recommended by their Individualized Education Programs, provide schools in need of improvement with one year to improve before providing transfer options to students, and provide special education and rural teachers with needed flexibility to meet NCLB's mandates through alternative mechanisms to prove qualifications. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2166.

The Teacher Excellence for All Children (TEACH) Act of 2007 (HR 2204), introduced by Representative Miller (D-CA), would amend both NCLB and the Higher Education Act to ensure that all children will be taught by high-quality teachers and all teachers will have the supports they need to do their job well. It would provide an additional $3.4 billion to provide financial incentives to encourage teachers to enter and remain in the profession, promote the establishment of teacher career advancement ladders, provide funding for school districts to pay higher salaries to exemplary highly qualified teachers and principals who transfer into the hardest-to-staff schools, and help new teachers transition into the classroom and build their skills through state-of-the-art induction programs. [Note: this bill is identical to S.1339 by Senator Kennedy (D-MA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2204.

The Striving Readers Act of 2007 (H.R. 2289), introduced by Representative Yarmuth (D-KY), would authorize $200 million in FY 2008 rising to $1 billion in FY 2012 for grants to states and districts to create literacy programs specifically for middle and high school students. It would help states create statewide literacy initiatives for students in grades 4 -12, share data on student progress with parents and the public, and improve teacher training and professional development in literacy so that all students receive high quality instruction. It would help districts and schools create plans to improve literacy for adolescents, develop improved assessments, train teachers in every subject area in literacy strategies and use regular data to improve teaching and learning; allow districts and schools to hire and place literacy coaches, train parents to support the literacy development of their child, and connect learning inside the classroom with learning that takes place outside the classroom; require states, districts, and schools to participate in a rigorous evaluation that demonstrates student progress; and require the federal government to complete an overall evaluation of the program to determine its impact on the nation's middle and high schools. [Note: the Senate companion to this bill is S. 958 by Senator Sessions (R-AL).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2289.

The Full-Service Community Schools Act of 2007 (H.R. 2323), introduced by Representative Hoyer (D-MD), would authorize $200 million for grants to partnerships between public school districts and community-based organizations to establish full-service community schools that coordinate educational, developmental, family, health, and other comprehensive services to students, families, and the community. Such services could include early childhood education, Head Start, family literacy, child care, primary health and dental services, mental health services, parenting education, nutrition, job training, adult education, and other services. [Note: This bill is identical to S. 1391 by Senator Nelson (D-NE).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2323.

The Student Bill of Rights (H.R. 2373), introduced by Representative Fattah (D-PA), would hold states accountable for providing all students access to the fundamentals of educational opportunity to ensure that all students receive educational opportunities that enable them to be participating, responsible citizens and to compete and succeed in a global economy. Defines such fundamentals as: high quality teachers and principals; rigorous academic standards, curricula, and methods of instruction; small classes; quality facilities, computers, textbooks and materials; up-to-date libraries; and qualified pupil services personnel. States would have to ensure that all schools have at least adequate access to each fundamental within 12 years. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2373.

The Achievement Through Technology and Innovation (ATTAIN) Act (H.R. 2449), introduced by Representative Roybal-Allard (D-CA), would revamp the Enhancing Education Through Technology program (Title II-D of NCLB) by focusing funds on professional development and systemic reform programs with strong technology components, prioritizing funding to schools in need of improvement, and requiring states to assess whether students have attained technological literacy by the eighth grade. It would strengthen the program's emphasis on teacher quality and technology skills by raising the portion of formula-grants set aside for professional development from 25% to 40%, while emphasizing the importance of timely and ongoing training. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2449.

The Mentoring America's Children Act of 2007 (H.R. 2611), introduced by Representative Davis (D-CA), would reauthorize the student mentoring program in ESEA (Sec. 4130) by increasing the availability and quality of the grants, and expanding the allowable uses to include improving outcomes of children by improving their school connectedness, decreasing absenteeism, and increasing academic performance. It also authorizes the Department of Education to conduct high-quality research into successful school-based mentoring programs. See if you Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2611

The Preparing Excellent Teachers Act (H.R. 2617), introduced by Representative Emanuel (D-IL), would establish an innovative framework for prospective teachers to partner with mentor teachers for an academic year, receive master's level coursework and certification, and gain hands-on classroom experience, similar to medical residency programs for training health professionals by creating a $50 million per year competitive partnership grant program under Title II of ESEA to support Teaching Residency Programs. It would fund programs in high-needs school districts, which would recruit, prepare, and provide ongoing mentoring and induction support through a partnership between a college or university, a school district, non-profit community partners, and other partners. It would also provide a stipend for teachers during their year of preparation, and require them to work in the district upon completion of the program. [Note: This bill is a companion to S. 1574 by Senator Obama (D-IL).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2617.

H.R. 2668, introduced by Representative Wu (D-OR), would authorize $2 billion per year for grants to states and school districts to carry out effective approaches to reducing class size through use of fully qualified teachers to improve educational achievement for both regular and special needs children, with particular consideration given to reducing class size in the early elementary grades. Other allowable uses of the class size reduction grants include: recruiting, hiring, and training fully qualified regular and special education teachers; testing new teachers for academic content knowledge, and to meet state certification or licensing requirements; and providing professional development for teachers in order to meet the goal of ensuring that all teachers have the general knowledge, teaching skills, and subject matter knowledge necessary to teach effectively in the content areas in which the teachers teach. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2668.

The Improving Student Learning and Classroom Performance Act of 2007 (H.R. 2846),  introduced by Representative Yarmuth (D-KY), would provide $200 million per year for grants to states to (1) improve the quality, validity, and reliability of state and local academic assessments, including the development or enhancement of state or local performance assessments that can be used for diagnostic purposes and as part of the state accountability system; (2) enable states to develop the capacity of local education agencies to validly and reliably assess student academic achievement using multiple sources of evidence, including school-based performance assessments; and (3) enable states and local districts to develop the capacity of teachers and school leaders to develop, use, and reliably evaluate the results of locally administered performance assessments. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2846.

The Reliable and Accurate Graduation Rate Act (H.R. 2862), introduced by Representative Castle (R-DE), would establish a uniform definition of a four-year graduation rate, while taking into consideration the additional time needed for students with special needs, or limited English proficient students, or those students who are dual-enrolled in high school and an institution of higher education. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2862.

The Teachers at the Table Act (H.R. 2896), introduced by Representative McCarthy (D-NY), would require the Secretary of Education to establish a Volunteer Teacher Advisory Committee to monitor the effects of ESEA on the ground, in classrooms, with a focus on children and families. Members of the Committee would be public school teachers appointed by the Secretary from within the National State Teachers of the Year organization (NSTOY). See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2896.

The Keep Teachers Teaching Act of 2007 (H.R. 2903), introduced by Representative Price (D-NC), would provide grants for innovative teacher retention programs, including professional development; teacher mentoring; advanced certification or advanced credentialing; research, travel, or fellowship opportunities; and pairing of teachers with professionals in research or industry. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2903.

The Gifted and Talented Students Education Act of 2007 (H.R. 2925), introduced by Representative Gallegly (R-CA), would authorize $170 million per year for grants for developing or expanding gifted and talented education programs. Funds would be used to identify and support gifted and talented students, including gifted and talented students from all economic, ethnic, and racial backgrounds, including students of limited English proficiency, and students with disabilities; meeting the educational needs of gifted and talented students; and training of personnel in the education of gifted and talented students. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2925.

The Graduation Promise Act of 2007 (H.R. 2928), introduced by Representative Hinojosa (D-TX), would 1) create a federal-state-local school reform partnership, focused on transforming the nation's lowest-performing high schools; 2) provide $2.5 billion to build capacity for secondary school improvement, and at the same time provide states and local school districts with the resources to ensure that high schools with the greatest challenges receive the support they need to implement research-based interventions; 3) strengthen state improvement systems to identify, differentiate among, and target the level of reform and resources necessary to improve low-performing high schools, while ensuring transparency and accountability. [Note: The Senate companion to this bill is S.1185 by Senator Bingaman (D-NM).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2928.

The State and Local Education Flexibility Act of 2007 (H.R. 2946), introduced by Representative Terry (R-NE), would make numerous changes to NCLB including: allowing states to use growth models, allowing states the flexibility to implement a localized testing system instead of statewide tests (as Nebraska now does), creating a differentiated system of categorizing schools that do not make AYP as opposed to the current "pass/fail" system, allowing states to test students with cognitive disabilities based on their Individualized Education Plans under IDEA, providing flexibility in including in AYP test scores of limited-English-proficient students, and providing flexibility for special education teachers, rural school teachers, and social studies teachers who teach multiple subjects to meet the highly qualified requirements of NCLB. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2946.

The Every Student Counts Act (H.R. 2955), introduced by Representative Scott (D-VA), would create a single, accurate, and consistent measurement for reporting and accountability of high school graduation rates, based on the National Governors Association's Graduation Rate Compact. It would require high schools to increase their graduation rates by meeting annual, research-based benchmarks with the long-term goal of reaching a 90 percent graduation rate. It would also require the disaggregation of graduation data by subgroup to ensure that schools are held accountable for increasing the graduation rate for all types of students. Finally, the bill would give schools credit for graduating students who need extra time by allowing students who graduate in five years to count toward a school's successful graduation rate. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2955.

The English Language Instruction Improvement Act of 2007 (H.R. 2957), introduced by Representative Baca (D-CA), would expand funding for and improve professional development for teachers of limited-English proficient children including the development and dissemination of best practices in the teaching of individuals with limited English proficiency to high levels of academic achievement with respect to challenging state content and student academic achievement standards and to high levels of academic proficiency in more than one language; and for the conduct of research and evaluation of educational services provided to individuals with limited English proficiency under this part. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 2957.

The 21st Century High-Performing Public School Facilities Act (H.R. 3021), introduced by Representative Chandler (D-KY), would authorize $32 billion over five years in matching grants and loans to public school districts for the construction and modernization of school facilities, technology upgrades and teacher technology training. School districts would be able to use the funds to repair or modernize school facilities; upgrade education and technology infrastructure; make public school facilities more energy-efficient; construct new facilities that ensure students' health and safety; bring schools into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act; undertake asbestos and lead abatement projects; reinstate funding for teacher technology training; and improve technological hardware and advanced computer workstations. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3021.

NOTE: The House of Representatives on June 4, 2008 passed, by a vote of 250-164, a revised version of the bill, now renamed the 21st Century Green High-Performing Public School Facilities Act (H. Rept. 110-623). The amended bill would authorize $6.4 billion for fiscal 2009 and such sums as necessary for the next four years for grants for modernizing, renovating, or repairing public school facilities to be safe, healthy, high-performing, and up-to-date technologically. It also authorizes separate funds of $500 million over five years to rebuild public schools damaged by hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  It allows funds to be used for repairs such as eradicating asbestos and lead-based paint, replacing electric wiring and plumbing, purchasing technology, meeting compliance with fire, health, and safety codes, modifications necessary to make public school facilities accessible to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or renovations  to reduce class size. It requires that a portion of the funds be used for projects that meet one of three widely recognized green building standards or equivalent state or local standards.   It also requires the Education Secretary, in consultation with the Energy Secretary and the EPA Administrator, to create a database of the best practices in school construction and to provide technical assistance to states and school districts in creating best practices for green school buildings. Grants to States and LEAs would be based on the same percentages of funds they receive under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

The No Child Left Inside Act of 2007 (H.R. 3036), introduced by Representative Sarbanes (D-MD), would amend Title II to authorize $100 million per year for grants for states and school districts to integrate environmental education into their K-12 curriculum to ensure that graduates are environmentally literate; develop, improve and advance environmental education standards; and train qualified teachers to teach environmental education courses and programs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3036.

NOTE: The House Education and Labor Committee on June 18, 2008, by a 37-8 vote,   reported a substitute version of the bill, renamed the No Child Left Inside Act of 2008 (H. Rept. 110-754).   The bill now amends the National Environmental Education Act to authorize $14 million in FY 2009 for its Environmental Education And Training   Program and “such sums” for a new competitive grant program intended to encourage nonprofits, state and local governments, and institutions of higher education to develop and implement academic standards and state curriculum frameworks for environmental education.   States or organizations that create environmental literacy plans, detailing how to initiate, expand, or improve environmental education programs in order to make progress toward meeting State standards for environmental learning   (to the extent such standards exist) and environmental literacy, would be eligible for funding.   It would encourage the use of educational programs offered by the states in conjunction with the national parks as programs eligible for grants under the measure. It also would allow schools to use grant money in the measure to teach children about recycling. It states that nothing in the bill could be construed as authorizing the federal government to mandate, direct or control state and local education agencies. It also would allow grants in the measure to be used for "environmental justice" programs that would teach high school children about the special environmental problems facing low-income areas.

The Families Conquering Literacy Together Act of 2007 (HR 3055),introduced by Representative Yarmuth (D-KY), would provide expanded resources, technical assistance, reasonable accountability, and professional development to entities implementing Even Start programs. It would require that such programs be designed to accommodate participants' work schedule and other responsibilities, such as the provision of support services, such as child care and transportation, and scheduling and locating of services to allow joint participation by parents and children; and include high-quality, intensive, and integrated instructional programs that operate on a year-round basis to promote adult literacy, to empower parents to support the educational growth of their children, to provide developmentally and linguistically appropriate early childhood educational services that prepare children for success in regular school programs and include the use of scientifically based reading research for children and the most rigorous research available for adults. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3055.

H.R. 3075, introduced by Representative Boozman (R- AR), would allow states to count for AYP calculations students formerly identified as limited English proficient as being within the limited English proficient subgroup for up to three years after they exit the group, and students formerly identified as students with disabilities as being within the students with disabilities subgroup for up top three years after they exit the group. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3075.

H.R. 3076, introduced by Representative Boozman (R- AR), would allow states to apply alternate and modified academic standards to students with disabilities who, consistent with the student's Individualized Education Program, and based on the student's disability and level of performance, should be provided opportunities to achieve grade-level proficiency beyond a given school year. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3076.

The Safe Schools Improvement Act of 2007 (H.R. 3132), introduced by Representative Sanchez (D-CA), would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act to include bullying and harassment prevention programs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3132.

HR 3205, The Homeless Education Improvement Act of 2007 (H.R. 3205), introduced by Representative Biggert (R-IL) would amend Subtitle VII-B of the McKinney -Vento Act (as amended by NCLB) to make a number of improvements in the education of homeless children program, including ensuring that homeless children and youth stay in their schools or origin because it is presumed to be in their best interest; establishing a dedicated funding stream at the state level to support the transportation of homeless children and youth to their schools of origin; expressly authorizing the use of Title I, Part A funds for transportation to stabilize the education of homeless children and youth.; and doubling the authorized funding level for McKinney-Vento. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3205

The Teachers Professional Development Institutes Act (H.R. 3209), introduced by Representative DeLauro (D-CT), would authorize grants to encourage the establishment and operation of Teachers Institutes, which would sponsor professional development for educators in a collaborative process. Resources can be used to provide technical assistance to assist local educational agencies and institutions of higher education in preparing to establish and operate the institutes. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3209

The Measuring and Evaluating Trends for Reliability, Integrity and Continued Success Act (H.R. 3253), introduced by Representative Holt (D-NJ), would require states accepting Title I, Part A funds to develop and implement a longitudinal data system within four years. The data system is required to include several elements, such as unique statewide student identifiers; student-level enrollment, demographic, and program participation information; the ability to match individual students' scores on academic assessments required under NCLB from year to year; student-level data on the entrance and exit of the education system of each student; a statewide audit system; unique statewide teacher identifiers; and the ability to link information from preschool through grade 12. The bill authorizes $150 million per year for each of the next four years for these purposes. The Secretary would be authorized to reserve up to 1 percent (or no more than $2 million) to support the operation of a state education data center. [Note: the Senate companion to this bill is S. 2014 by Sen. Brown (D-OH).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3253

The Universal Prekindergarten and Early Childhood Education Act of 2007 (H.R. 3263), introduced by Representative Norton (D-DC), would authorize educational agencies that receive 21st Century Community Learning Center grants (after-school programs) to use the award for educational activities for children 4 years of age or younger if the agency agrees to phase in, where possible, a pre-kindergarten program. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3263

The Providing Resources Early for Kids (PRE-K) Act of 2007 (H.R. 3289), introduced by Representative Hirono (D-HI), would provide $1 billion in grants to enhance or improve state-funded preschool programs to increase the number of teachers with baccalaureate degrees and teachers' aides with associate degrees, increase the compensation or benefits for staff, decrease group size in classrooms, improve the teacher-to-student ratios in classrooms, provide comprehensive services that support healthy child development and positive child outcomes, extend the number of hours per day or weeks per year of program operations, improve the state's system for monitoring the quality of the programs, provide opportunities for intensive and on-going research- and evidence-based professional development, renovate existing facilities, and improve the early learning environments for children from birth to age three. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3289

NOTE: The House Education and Labor Committee on June 26, 2008, by a 31-11 vote,   reported a substitute version of the bill, renamed the Providing Resources Early for Kids (PRE-K) Act of 2008 that would authorize $500 million each year over five years for states to enhance their state-based preschool programs. States would be divided into two categories, “qualified” or “select.” Those deemed “qualified” —those that currently operate preschool programs that meet certain standards in the bill — would be eligible to receive formula funding based on the proportion of children from families at or below the poverty line. “Select” states —those without any state-funded preschool programs or those with programs that do not meet quality requirements — would be eligible for competitive grants, also based on the proportion of poor children they serve. “Qualified” states would have to match 30 percent of the grant award, and “select” states would have to match 50 percent of the grant.  Funds would be used to:  Increase the number of teachers and program directors with bachelor degrees in early childhood education or a related field; increase the number of teacher aides with associates degrees in early childhood education or related field; increase compensation and benefits for teachers, program directors and teacher aides; decrease group size or improving teacher-student ratios; provide comprehensive services such as health screenings, parent involvement and nutrition services; extend the length of the preschool day; complete minor renovations to existing facilities; or preschool teacher training.

The Student and Teacher Safety Act of 2007 (H.R. 3291), introduced by Representative Kirk (R-IL), would require local educational agencies to have in place policies that ensure that searches of public school students for suspected improper or illegal activity are deemed reasonable and permissible, as a condition of receiving Safe and Drug Free School funds after fiscal year 2008. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3291

The Education Assessment Technical Corrections Act (H.R. 3292), introduced by Representative Kirk (R-IL), would provide, among other things, additional time for teachers in hard-to-staff areas to meet the highly qualified teacher requirements; provide flexibility in measuring AYP if there was a 10 percent decrease in the number of students who did not make AYP in the prior year; require the Secretary to submit to Congress recommendations for increasing the percentage or limited English proficient students and students with disabilities who meet or exceed the state's proficient level of academic achievement; allow students with disabilities to be tested at the student's instructional level rather than at grade level, provided that the assessments progress from year to year to account for a student's academic growth; modify the method for counting students who fit into more than one subgroup; provide for nuanced sanctions; and require the Department to continue to study the use of growth models and allow more states and districts to use growth models. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3292

The Improving Mathematics and Science Teacher Quality Act (H.R. 3313), introduced by Representative Ehlers (R-MI), would provide grants for eligible partnerships to conduct various activities to improve teacher quality, such as those that replicate model math and science professional development programs. The Secretary must consult with the National Science Foundation before identifying selected programs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3313

The Substitute Teaching Improvement Act (H.R. 3345), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ), would authorize a $5 million competitive demonstration grant program to train substitute teachers in classroom management and professionalism, effective teaching strategies, and education laws, as well as to train principals and permanent teachers in effectively integrating substitute teachers in school operations. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3345

H.R. 3357, introduced by Representative Miller (D-CA), would reauthorize the National Writing Project through a grant of $30 million. The National Writing Project provides teacher training programs in effective approaches and processes for the teaching of writing. [Note: this bill is identical to. S. 1015 by Sen. Cochran (R-MS).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3357

The Support Our Schools With Quality Teaching Act of 2007 (H.R. 3394), introduced by Representative Davis (D-CA), would provide $15 million per year for competitive grants for up to 250 local educational agencies to recruit, support, and retain highly qualified and effective teachers through participation in the "Targeted High Need Initiative Take One!" program of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3394

The Success in the Middle Act of 2007 (H.R. 3406), introduced by Representative Grijalva (D-AZ), would authorize $1 billion per year for states to carry out a plan that shows what students are required to know and do to successfully complete the middle grades and make the transition to succeed in an academically rigorous high school that prepares students for postsecondary education and the workplace; and would provide $100 million per year to develop or adapt effective practices to turn around low-performing middle schools, and to strengthen research focused on the middle grades. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3406

The Positive Behavior for Effective Schools Act (H.R. 3407), introduced by Representative Hare (D-IL), would expand the use of early intervening services, particularly schoolwide positive behavior supports, to systematically create a school climate that is highly conducive to learning. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3407

The Reducing Barriers to Learning Act of 2007 (H.R. 3419), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA), would establish an Office of Specialized Instructional Support Services in the Department of Education and provide grants to states to reduce barriers to learning. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3419

The Flexibility for Individual Excellence in Education Act of 2007 (H.R. 3426), introduced by Representative Matheson (D-UT), would provide additional clarity for highly qualified teacher (HQT) provisions by permitting middle and secondary teachers to meet HQT requirements by having a minor in the relevant subject, by providing $50 million and additional time to help rural schools meet the HQT requirements, and by limiting highly qualified teacher concept to teachers of core subjects; as well making numerous changes to the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and assessment requirements, including allowing growth and multiple measures to be included in AYP, allowing students with disabilities to be assessed at their level of instruction in compliance with their individualized education plan, limiting designating a school as "in need of improvement" only when the same subgroup of students fails in the same subject for at least two consecutive years, limiting the school choice and supplemental education service (SES) requirements to students in the subgroup that failed AYP, allowing states to offer SES prior to school choice. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3426

The Bullying and Gang Reduction for Improved Education Act (H.R. 3438), introduced by Representative Linda Sanchez (D-CA), would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act to authorize the use of grant funds for gang prevention. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3438

The Put School Counselors Where They're Needed Act (H.R. 3439), introduced by Representative Linda Sanchez (D-CA), would fund additional secondary school counselors in troubled Title I schools to reduce the dropout rate. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3439

H.R. 3463, introduced by Representative Holt (D-NJ), would establish a partnership between the Department of Education and the National Park Service to provide educational opportunities for students and teachers, including professional development for educators and programs that emphasize science, environment, natural resources, math, civics and history. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3463.

NOTE: Provisions of this bill were incorporated into HR 3036 as reported by teh House Education and Labor Committee.

The Improving the Leadership and Effectiveness of Administrators for Districts (I LEAD) Act of 2007 (H.R. 3523), introduced by Representative Davis (D-CA), would authorize competitive grants to high-need local educational agencies; consortia of high-need local educational agencies; and partnerships of high-need local educational agencies, nonprofit organizations, and institutions of higher education to develop a generation of school leaders who are committed to, and effective in, increasing student achievement and to ensure that all low-income, underperforming schools are led by effective school leaders who are well prepared to foster student success. [Note: this bill is identical to. S. 837 by Senator Clinton (D- NY).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3523.

The Rural Education Achievement Program Reauthorization Act (H.R. 3545), introduced by Representative Pomeroy (D-ND), would strengthen the Rural Education Achievement Program in Title VI of NCLB by allowing districts that are eligible for both programs the opportunity to participate in the Rural and Low Income School Program if they do not receive any financial benefit from the Small and Rural Schools Achievement Program; updating the locale codes used to classify rural schools to be consistent with those developed by the Census Bureau and the National Center for Education Statistics; increasing the minimum and maximum grants under the Small and Rural Schools Achievement Program to $25,000 and $80,000, respectively, when the appropriation for REAP reaches $200 million; and changing the poverty measure from 20 percent of poverty as determined by the Census to 40 percent free and reduced lunch. [Note: this bill is identical to. S. 2051 by Senator Conrad (D- ND).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3545.

The Access to Complete Education Act (H.R. 3606), introduced by Representative Woolsey (D-CA), would provide grants for core curriculum development in order to strengthen the instruction of music and arts, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, history, geography, and physical education and health as an integral part of the elementary and secondary school curriculum. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3606.

The Bringing Success to Scale Act (H.R. 3611), introduced by Representative Shea-Porter (D-NH), would establish the Bringing Success to Scale for making academic achievement awards that recognize local educational agencies and schools that have significantly closed achievement gaps; exceeded the state's annual measurable objectives; have made significant improvement on other meaningful data such as graduation rates and increased recruitment and placement of high quality teachers and principals; and demonstrate that they have established partnerships with the private sector, which may include philanthropic organizations, and will provide matching funds. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3611.

H.R. 3613, introduced by Representatives Bilbray (R-CA), would ensure that students with disabilities who take the academic assessments on which adequate yearly progress is based and who utilize the reasonable accommodations for children with disabilities (as defined in section 602(3) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1401(3))), or the modifications for children with disabilities they regularly use in daily classroom instruction as documented in their individualized education program or their plan under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), are counted for the purposes of determining adequate yearly progress. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3613.

H.R. 3641, introduced by Representative Musgrave (R-CO), would allow teachers in rural areas who are highly qualified in one subject to have 3 years from their hiring date to become highly qualified in each additional subject they teach. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3641.

The Expanded Learning Time Demonstration Act (H.R. 3642), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ), would provide grants for expanded learning time and redesigning schools and programs to improve student achievement through longer school days, additional school days, or a combination of longer school days and additional school days, as well as other methods. While we support the overall program, we believe it must be subject to collective bargaining. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3642.

The Rural Students College, Career, and Community Readiness Act of 2007 (H.R. 3661), introduced by Representative McCarthy (D-NY), would provide resources to conduct demonstration projects to improve the educational and career outcomes of rural, low-income students in grades 7 through 12 that will seek to improve the academic motivation and performance of rural students, improve graduation rates of rural students, and increase the rates among rural students of application to institutions of higher education, among other purposes. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3661.

The Educational Advisor and Contractor Integrity Act (H.R. 3718), introduced by Representative Altmire (D-PA), would require the Secretary of Education to address conflicts of interest associated with use of advisory committees and technical assistance providers in the administration of ESEA by establishing a screening process for advisory committee candidates and technical assistance providers, and to establish conflict-of-interest policies for advisory committee embers and technical assistance providers. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3718.

H.R. 3759, introduced by Representative Kilpatrick (D-MI), would enable local educational agencies to use amounts received from the Fund for the Improvement of Education for innovative programs to increase learning in financial literacy. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3759.

H.R. 3760, introduced by Representative Kilpatrick (D-MI), would enable local educational agencies to use amounts received from the Fund for the Improvement of Education for innovative programs to increase learning in nutrition and exercise. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3760.

The Working to Encourage Community Action and Responsibility in Education Act (the WE CARE Act) (H.R. 3762), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA), would foster community involvement by better coordinating services and promoting stronger enhanced partnerships between schools and their communities that can contribute to student success and greater family and community involvement in creating the conditions for learning for their children. It would also require that state and LEA Title I plans include an assessment of the nonacademic factors influencing student achievement. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3762.

The Getting Retention and Diplomas Up Among Today's Enrolled Students Act (the GRADUATES Act) (H.R. 3763), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA), would authorize a $500 million grant program to eligible partnerships of a state or local educational agency and an institution of higher education, a nonprofit or community-based organization, or a business to develop and implement innovative programs to increase graduation rates and help prepare at-risk students for postsecondary education and the workforce. It would allow strategies such as the creation of career academies, dual-enrollment programs, smaller learning communities, alternative education settings, expanded learning time opportunities, and programs that provide greater emphasis on the transition needs of at-risk students as they exit high school and enter college or the workforce. It would require LEAs to determine how to measure and report indicators such as student attendance or participation, credit accumulation rates, core course failure rates, college enrollment and persistence rates, or number or percentage of students taking Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or other postsecondary education courses, rigorous postsecondary education preparatory courses, or workforce apprenticeship and training programs. [Note: This bill is identical to S. 1920 by Senator Reid (D-NV).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3763.

The Providing Resources to Improve Dual Language Education Act of 2007 (the PRIDE Act) (H.R. 3842), introduced by Representative Solis (D-CA) would authorize $15 million per year for the Secretary to award up to five grants to carry out demonstration projects to enhance the biliteracy, bilingualism, and multicultural skills for children in impoverished communities, including limited-English-proficient and minority children, through the use and longitudinal evaluation of dual language programs beginning in preschool through the fifth grade. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3842.

H.R. 3853, introduced by Representative Ellison (D-MN), would amend Title IV of ESEA to provide for a National Resource Center for Positive Youth Development and School Success, which would provide resources, publications, and training to state and local educational agencies on the positive relationships, opportunities, and skills that students need to succeed in school and avoid risky behavior; and conduct and publish research on the relationship between a strength-based approach to youth development and school success, including academic achievement and retention of the teaching force. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3853.

The Public School Repair and Renovation Act of 2007 (H.R. 3902), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA), would create a $1.6 billion grant program to states to provide competitive grants to local school districts for school renovation and repair. Funding could be used for making urgent repairs to schools, such as roof replacement, remedying fire code violations, repairing or replacing ventilation, heating, and cooling systems, compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, asbestos removal, and charter school infrastructure repairs and renovation. [Note: This bill is identical to S. 1942 by Senator Harkin (D-IA).] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3902.

The Student Breakfast and Education Improvement Act of 2007 (H.R. 3978), introduced by Representative Moore (D-WI), would amend Title V of ESEA to improve the health and education of children through grants to expand school breakfast programs. Grants to schools would be used to establish, promote, or expand a school breakfast program; increase the quantity of local or fresh food available; provide nutritional education materials to students; extend the period during which school breakfast is available; increase participation in the school breakfast program, including through a universal free breakfast program; and other purposes. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3978.

The Assessment Accuracy and Improvement Act (H.R. 3979), introduced by Representative Petri (D-WI), would allow states to use adaptive assessments (rather than the assessments otherwise required by NCLB) that accurately assess student achievement above and below grade level while also measuring grade-level performance. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 3979.

H.R. 4100, introduced by Representative Woolsey (D-CA), would amend ESEA to establish an instructional level assessment pilot program under Title VI. Up to 10 state education agencies would receive grants to conduct pilot programs to determine the effectiveness of assessing students with disabilities who are achieving significantly below grade-level proficiency at their instructional level, and to facilitate quality instruction for such students. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4100.

H.R. 4265, Phylicia's Law, introduced by Representative Rothman (D-NJ), would amend the Safe and Drug-Free Schools program in Title IV of ESEA to help keep students safe by requiring school districts receiving funds under this program to provide an assurance that before every off-premises, overnight field trip, a written safety plan is developed by the school sponsoring the trip and provided to the parents of the children concerned. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4265.

The Student Testing Act of 2007 (H.R. 4305), introduced by Representative Allen (D-ME), would allow states to use growth models and multiple measures to assess student learning and school success, ending the over-reliance upon two standardized tests given one day out of the year; allow states to return to the pre-NCLB requirement of statewide annual testing once in elementary school, once in middle school, and once in high school; and provide grants to states to significantly improve the quality of their assessments and place far greater emphasis on higher order and critical thinking skills, instead of rote memorization. [Note: This bill is basically identical to S. 2053 by Sen. Feingold (D-WI), except it does not contain a funding offset.] See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4305.

The Youth Financial Education Act (H.R. 4335), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ), would amend Title IV of ESEA by authorizing a $100 million grant program to state educational agencies to develop and integrate youth financial education programs for students in elementary and secondary schools. Funds would be used by local educational agencies and public schools serving low-income populations to carry out financial education programs for students in kindergarten through grade 12 based on the concept of achieving financial literacy through the teaching of personal financial management skills and the basic principles involved with earning, spending, saving, investing, credit, and insurance; and to carry out professional development programs to prepare teachers and administrators for financial education.  See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4335.

The Prescribe a Book Act (H.R. 4449), introduced by Representative Payne (D-NJ), would amend the Reading First program in ESEA by adding a new Pediatric Early Literacy grant program through which healthcare providers, doctors, and nurses, trained in research-based methods of early language and literacy promotion, encourage parents to read aloud to their young children, and offer developmentally appropriate recommendations and strategies to parents for the purpose of reading aloud to their children; healthcare providers, at health supervision visits, provide each child between the ages of 6 months and 5 years a new, developmentally appropriate children's book to take home and keep; and volunteers in waiting areas of healthcare facilities read aloud to children, modeling for parents the techniques and pleasures of sharing books together.  See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4449.

The Fair Funding for Schools Act (H.R. 4540), introduced by Representative Hirono (D-HI), would reauthorize the Impact Aid program in ESEA. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4540.

The Josh Miller Helping Everyone Access Responsive Treatment in Schools Act of 2007 (the Josh Miller HEARTS Act) (H.R. 4926),  introduced by Representative Sutton (D-OH), would establish a grant program under Title IV of ESEA for automated external defibrillators in schools. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 4926.

NOTE: The House of Representatives on June 9 , 2008 passed by voice vote a revised version of this bill, renamed the Josh Miller Helping Everyone Access Responsive Treatment in Schools Act of 2008 (the Josh Miller HEARTS Act) which creates a grant program for LEAs to purchase automated external defibrillators and to provide training on the use of such defibrillators.

The GREEN School Improvement Act (H.R. 5401), introduced by Representative Loebsack (D-IA), would authorize $2 billion per year for the Secretary of Education to make grants to states and LEAs for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy improvements at public school facilities. Research shows that these improvements would save schools money, better the lives of the 14 million students attending schools considered below standard or dangerous, reduce teacher turnover, and reduce teacher and student sick days by twelve to fifteen percent. While evaluating the applications for these grants, the Secretary and the State educational agency shall give priority to high-need local education agencies. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 5401.

NOTE: Provisions of this bill were included in HR 3021, 21st Century Green High-Performing Public School Facilities Act, as passed by the House.

The NCLB Recess Until Reauthorization Act (H.R. 6239), introduced by Rep. Graves (R-MO), would suspend, during the 2008-2009 school year, new identifications of schools or local educational agencies as needing: (1) improvement, after they fail to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) for two consecutive years; (2) corrective action, after they fail to make AYP for an additional two years after being identified as needing improvement; or (3) restructuring, after they fail to make AYP after a year of corrective action. Lifts such suspension on the earlier of the last day of the 2008-2009 school year or the enactment of a reauthorization of Title I of ESEA. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R 6239.

The Parents' Right to Know Improvement Act (H.R. 6292), introduced by Rep. Heller (R-NV) would require local educational agencies (LEAs) to notify the parents of each student at the beginning of each school year that they will provide the parents, upon request, with timely information regarding the professional qualifications of their child's specialized instructional support persons. (This is in addition to the current requirement that LEAs provide parents, upon request, with information regarding the professional qualifications of their child's classroom teachers.) Defines "specialized instructional support persons" as school counselors, social workers, psychologists, or other qualified professionals providing services that are part of a comprehensive program to meet student needs. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 6292.

The Military Children's School Investment Act (H.R. 6293), introduced by Rep. Hayes (R-NC) would amend the Impact Aid program of ESEA to authorize $500 million per year for the Secretary of Education to award grants to LEAs that: (1) were eligible for Impact Aid in the prior fiscal year due to federally-connected children; and (2) are experiencing an enrollment increase of at least 250 or 10% consisting of certain federally-connected children whose arrival is due to military base closures and realignments or global rebasing, force structure changes or reductions, or actions initiated by the Secretary of Defense. Requires such grants to be used: (1) to construct new schools or expand existing schools to accommodate the influx of students; (2) repair or upgrade academic facilities; or (3) lease, with the Secretary's approval, buildings or portions of buildings from a private entity for additional school space. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 6293.

The Increasing Student Achievement through School Attendance Act (H.R. 6402), introduced by Rep. Johnson (D-TX), would amend Title IV of ESEA to direct the Secretary of Education to award grants to local educational agencies, states, and Indian tribes for the implementation of innovative measures to increase school attendance by preventing student truancy, suspension, and expulsion. Includes among such measures: (1) collaboration between school systems, the legal system, child welfare agencies, and community-based organizations; (2) training school personnel in positive student behavioral interventions and graduated disciplinary practices; and (3) staffing of school suspension and expulsion programs with student support services personnel. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 6402.

The Promoting the Safe Use of the Internet by Students Act of 2008 (H.R. 6490), introduced by Rep. Kuhl (R-NY) would amend both the Enhancing Education Through Technology and the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities programs in ESEA to make as allowable uses of funds: educating students about appropriate online behavior, including interacting with individuals on social networking Web sites and in chat rooms; protecting students against online predators, cyberbullying, or unwanted exposure to inappropriate material; or promoting involvement by parents in the use of the Internet by their children. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 6490.

The Coordinate to Educate Act (H.R. 6504), introduced by Rep. Woolsey (D-CA) would authorize $300 million per year in grants to local education agencies to improve students' educational performances by: (1) removing barriers to their learning; (2) coordinating and enhancing the effectiveness of support services; (3) making support services available, affordable, and convenient for those who need them; (4) replicating and disseminating successful high quality coordinated service programs; (5) increasing parental involvement in education; (6) improving the capacity of school and support service personnel to collaborate; (7) integrating services, regulations, data bases, eligibility procedures and funding sources whenever possible; and (8) focusing school and community resources on prevention and early intervention strategies to address student needs and to ensure that students are ready to learn when they are in the classroom. See if your Representative is a cosponsor of H.R. 6504.

The Increased Student Achievement Through Increased Student Support Act (H.R. 6654) introduced by Rep. Towns (D-NY), would increase the recruitment and retention of school counselors, school social workers, and school psychologists through competitive, renewable, five-year grants to partnerships between low-income local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools offering graduate programs in school counseling, social work, or psychology to increase the number of program graduates employed by low-income LEAs. Allows the use of grant funds to: (1) provide program graduate students with field training at partnership LEA schools; (2) contribute to program graduates' salaries at such schools for up to three years after they graduate; (3) increase the number of school counselors, social workers, and psychologists per student in such schools; (4) enhance the capacity of partnership graduate schools to train such professionals; (5) develop course work designed to facilitate such graduates' service to low-income LEAs and at-risk students; and (6) provide tuition credits to such graduate students and student loan forgiveness to program graduates employed as school counselors, social workers, or psychologists by low-income LEAs for at least five years. It also directs the Secretary to establish a program providing student loan forgiveness to non-participants in this Act's grant program who have been employed for at least five years as school counselors, social workers, or psychologists by low-income LEAs. [Note: this bill is identical to S. 3364 by Sen. Lincoln (D-AR).]  See if your Senator is a cosponsor of H.R. 6654.

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