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Border Crossing: Teacher Meets ESP


A new teacher and an experienced ESP bond over barbeque, soccer, and living with a language barrier.


By John Rosales


Throughout the year, Rivera High School custodian Ramón Tamayo fires up his grill to celebrate his children's birthdays. In addition to standards like hot dogs and chicken, his inventive Tex-Mex menu might feature cabrito (roasted goat), menudo (tripe soup), and ceviche (marinated shrimp).

In 2006, when Tamayo's friend from work, second-year teacher and native New Yorker Matthew Webster, attended the birthday party of Tamayo's 12-year-old daughter, he learned a classic Brownsville, Texas, tradition.

"They grill on the front lawn here," says Webster, 24. "In New York, we grill in back."

Grilling traditions are just one of many differences between these unlikely pals: a teacher and a custodian from separate generations, with diverse backgrounds and a different first language. Yet, their friendship developed around what they have in common: a passion for soccer and a commitment to helping students deal with cultural barriers.

Webster would seek out Tamayo, 54, after school as Tamayo cleaned classrooms during his evening work shift.

"It was our time to talk," says Webster. "After I found out that he played and coached soccer in Mexico, I asked for his help with the team."

In addition to teaching English and ESL, Webster also coaches a speech club and the junior varsity boys soccer team.

"¿Cómo se dice esta palabra (How do you say this word)?" Webster says he would ask in one breath, then in the next, "Which is the best soccer team in Mexico?" Tamayo always took the time to answer.

Like many new teachers, Matthew Webster (left) found a mentor and friend in his school's custodian Ramon Tamayo.

"He took me under his wing," Webster says. And that's exactly what Webster needed. The lifelong East Coaster had signed up with Teach for America after his 2006 graduation from Penn State. Traveling down to the Rio Grande Valley, Webster imagined "tumbleweed and cowboy country." In reality, he says, he found "America's Mexico."

He recalls the first time he came to the security checkpoint about 50 miles north of where he would be living. "I wondered what kind of place I was going to...a no-man's land where they stop motorists and inspect their cars."

The high school honors graduate and marathon runner who studied in Ireland found himself more than a little disoriented among the farms, fields, and sweat of Texas' southernmost city.

"I didn't know who to go to with language and cultural issues," says Webster.

He felt fortunate that Tamayo was willing to help him navigate his new home, a place of many intersections, between First and Third Worlds, wealth and poverty, English and Spanish.

Tamayo has worked at Rivera for three years but he's lived in the city for almost 20. He knows many of the school's 2,000 students and most of the neighborhoods in Brownsville and its sister city of Matamoros, Mexico. Reflective and reserved but not without a sense of humor, Tamayo speaks little English and is known as an excellent cook and athlete who once coached soccer in Mexico.

"He is very important to me," says Tamayo, in Spanish, of Webster. "We have different backgrounds, but once we got to know each other we found out we have a lot in common."

It's not unusual for a new teacher to find a friend or mentor who is an education support professional (ESP), says Laura Montgomery, president of the NEA National Council for ESPs.

"When new teachers arrive at school, there's always an ESP around to help them get oriented," Montgomery says. "Teachers and ESPs might have different roles [at school], but they have the same mission to serve students."

In addition to classroom issues, Webster and Tamayo also enjoy talking about Brownsville's border culture.

"I taught him to eat Mexican food with lots of chili," Tamayo says.

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Published In

August, 2008


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