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Higher Education Funding

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Impact on Higher Education

Check on how the new economic recovery bill, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) affects higher education institutions, students, faculty and staff.  See the power-point (4MB) from the March 17, 2009 webinar by NEA’s Education Policy and Practice Director, Joel Packer.

NEA Resources:

The following reports from severalNEA Almanac of Higher Educationpublications shed light on the issues of higher education finance:

  • States and Higher Education: On Their Own in a Stagnant Economy by William Zumeta [2012 Almanac] inlcuding,
  • State Support of Higher Education: The Roller Coaster Plunges Downward Yet Again by William Zumeta [2009 Almanac]
  • Higher Education Funding: On the Way Up, But for How Long? by William Zumeta [2008 Almanac]
  • Financing Higher Education Access in Challenging Times by William Zumeta [2007 Almanac]
  • The New Finance of Public Higher Education by William Zumeta [2006 Almanac]
  • Higher Education's Fiscal Fortunes: Some Light in the Tunnel at Last by William Zumeta [2005 Almanac]
  • Higher Education Funding: Stagnation Continues; Financial Restructuring Underway by William Zumeta [2004 Almanac]
  • Higher Education Finance: In Recession Again(, 280KB, 13pp)
  • Higher Education in the States: Teetering in the Brink Once Again  (, 351KB, 14pp)
  • Higher Education Finance in the Nineties: Lessons for the New Millennium (, 73KB, 11pp)

    Update, NEA's Research Center's research briefs, provide leaders with information on current research, trends and issues affecting higher education finance.

    • "Access and Choice" January 2003 (, 562KB, 4pp)
      This report illustrates how the nation continues to struggle with academic and financial access to a college education. Low-income students face large financial barriers. Increasing tuition costs have offset increases in student aid. Loans are the largest source of student aid for public two and four year institutions.
    • "Faculty Salaries, 2002-03" September 2003
      Based on the findings in this report, it's clear that faculty salaries are not driving tuition increases. Over a 30 year period, the average salary (in constant dollars) for all ranks increased 4.6%.
    • "Why Are College Prices Increasing and What Should We Do About It?"
      The December 2003 Research Center Update report ( , 961k) explains how the ability of most public colleges to hold down tuition costs is directly related to the state funding they receive. [On new site:  Research Update VOLUME 9 • NUMBER 5 • DECEMBER 2003]

    Recent Reports
    Long, Bridget T. "The Impact of Higher Education Tax Credits for Higher Education Expenses", Working Paper 9553, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2003. This study concludes that access to higher education did not improve and the tax credit facilitated tuition increases. Read our summary of this report.


  • RESEARCH AND TOOLS


    Long, Bridget T. "The Impact of Higher Education Tax Credits for Higher Education Expenses", Working Paper 9553, National Bureau of Economic Research, March 2003. This study concludes that access to higher education did not improve and the tax credit facilitated tuition increases. Read our summary of this report.



    Visit the news archive for headlines on the fiscal crisis in higher education.
    • Research Center Update
      This report explains how the ability of most public colleges to hold down tuition costs is directly related to the state funding they receive.