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Rankings of the States 2015 and Estimates of School Statistics 2016

The data presented in this combined report provide facts about the extent to which local, state, and national governments commit resources to public education. NEA Research offers this report to its state and local affiliates as well as to researchers, policymakers, and the public as a tool to examine public education policies, programs, and services.

 



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Rankings & Estimates: Rankings of the States 2015 and Estimates of School Statistics 2016 ( PDF, 868 KB, 130 pgs.)

(released: May 2016)




HIGHLIGHTS


Enrollment

In fall 2014, U.S. public school enrollment was 49,682,888, up 0.2 percent over fall 2013.

The largest percentage increases from fall 2013 to fall 2014 were in:

  • North Dakota (1.9%),
  • Washington (1.6%),
  • Utah (1.6%), and
  • Nebraska (1.6%).

Twenty-one states experienced declines in student enrollment in fall 2014. The greatest declines were in:

  • Vermont (-4.4%),
  • Hawaii (-3.8%),
  • Rhode Island (-2.7%),
  • New Hampshire (-1.4%),
  • Connecticut (-1.3%),
  • Michigan (-1.1%), and
  • New York (-1.0%).

Classroom Teachers

There were 3,141,487 public school teachers in 2014–15. The average number of students per teacher was 15.8 in both 2013–14 and 2014–15.

The following states had the highest number of students enrolled per teacher in fall 2014:

  • Utah (22.8),
  • California (22.5),
  • Oregon (20.7),
  • Idaho (19.7), and
  • Washington (19.1).

States with the lowest student–teacher ratios were:

  • Vermont (9.7),
  • New Hampshire (11.7),
  • New Jersey (11.9),
  • Missouri (12.1), and
  • West Virginia (12.1).

Males comprised 23.7 percent of U.S. public school teachers in 2015.

Classroom Teacher Salaries

The U.S. average public school teacher salary for 2014–15 was $57,420.

State average teacher salaries ranged from those in New York ($77,628), the District of Columbia ($75,490), and Massachusetts ($75,398) at the high end to South Dakota ($40,934), Mississippi ($42,564), and Idaho ($45,218) at the low end.

Over the decade from 2004–05 to 2014–15, in constant dollars, average salaries for teachers decreased 1.6 percent.

  • Wyoming (15.5%),
  • New York (13.6%),
  • Massachusetts (12.3%),
  • North Dakota (11.0%), and
  • Iowa (10.7%)

had the largest real increases in salaries during that 10-year period.

Adjusted for inflation, 35 states saw real declines in average teacher salaries over the past decade. The following states had average salaries declining 6.5 percent or more:

  • Illinois (-13.5%),
  • Indiana (-11.0%),
  • Mississippi (-10.5%),
  • North Carolina (-10.2%),
  • Idaho (-9.9%),
  • Arkansas (-9.6%),
  • Colorado (-7.7%),
  • Arizona (-7.6%),
  • Tennessee (-7.1%),
  • Washington (-6.5%), and
  • Georgia (-6.5%).

Without inflation adjustment, the average one-year change in teacher salaries from 2013–14 to 2014–15 was 1.4%.

Expenditures per Student

The U.S. average per student expenditure in 2014–15 fall enrollment was $11,709. The following states had the highest per student expenditures:

  • Vermont ($23,149), New York ($21,366),
  • New Jersey ($20,925),
  • Alaska ($20,117), and
  • Rhode Island ($19,676).

Arizona ($7,461), Utah ($7,711), Indiana ($8,034), Oklahoma ($8,043), and North Dakota ($8,518) had the lowest per student expenditures.

School Revenues

School funding continues to come primarily from state and local sources. Between 2013–14 and 2014–15, the local share increased from 44 to 44.4 percent, and the state share decreased slightly from 46.6 to 46.4. The federal share decreased to 9.2 percent. Throughout the past 10 years, state and local governments had each provided between 43 and 48 percent of the total revenues.



RELATED ITEMS

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RELATED TOPICS

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