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Parent Partnership Resources


Educators and Parents Working Together

Educators and parents are the most important adults in a child’s life. That's why NEA members throughout the nation are working closely with parents to ensure our students succeed.

Common Core State Standards

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Practical Information Parents Can Use

Developed through a joint effort between NEA and National Parent Teacher Association (PTA), these two-page guides provide parents and caregivers with fundamental tools to encourage their children's success in school.

Download Brochures or Order Online or by Phone

Download the PDF versions below or, if you prefer, order up to ten hard copies of each 4-color brochure at no charge.

Order online or call toll free 800-717-9790.

 

Choosing Supplemental Education
Service Providers
English N/A
Testing at Your Child's School English Spanish
Hey Mom, I Want To Be An Engineer! English N/A
Raising Scientifically Literate Children English Spanish
Helping Your Child with Today's Math English N/A
Helping Your Child Learn to Read English N/A
Raising Ready Readers—and Keeping
Them That Way
English N/A
Helping Your Teen Get the Most Out
of High School
English N/A
Helping Your Child Do Well in School English N/A
A Successful Kindergarten Transition English N/A
Preparing Your Child for School English N/A

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Raise Your Hand for Public Education

NEA is issuing a renewed call to action—Raise Your Hand—a national initiative to mobilize educators, parents, and community leaders who share our commitment to ensuring the success of all our students.


RELATED TOPICS

Not On Our Watch, Part 1: Florida educators, parents shield students from “parent trigger”

Not On Our Watch, Part 2: Kansas educators, parents keep lawmakers in check

Not On Our Watch, Part 3: Educators, parents achieve a ‘measure of progress’ in Seattle