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In The Air


Found in: science; preK-2; 3-5; 6-8; 9-12

In The Air provides cross-curricular environmental education lessons and activities on airborne toxics. Five grade level modules (K-3, 3-6, 6-8, 9-12, and adult) make connections between behavior and air quality. A module matrix (PDF , 38.4 KB, 2 pgs.) lists subject connections. Each module centers on a core activity. A teachers guide with correlations to National Education Standards is included with each module. Modules can be downloaded in part or in their entirety.

K-3 Students prepare a puppet show ("Gloomy-Doomy Go Away!") as they learn how air gets dirty and how we can have cleaner air. Older students can perform the puppet show while the K-3 audience interacts. Three connecting activities demonstrate simple facts about air pollution and pollution prevention. A background section defines terms and includes charts, graphs, and a history of government efforts to main air quality.

3-6 Students learn about airborne toxics, their sources, and simple steps people can take to protect the quality of our air. The core activity is the reading of a chapter book, Matt Tackles Air Toxics. Most chapters have associated activities or extensions. Three connecting Activities explore pollutants, pollutant dispersal, and anti-pollution efforts.

6-8 Students continue to learn about airborne toxics, their sources, and simple steps people can take to protect the quality of our air. The core activity is a classroom game “Cleaner Air Everywhere,” in which teams of students compete for the next location of a successful environmental theme park. Three connecting activities explore pollutant dispersal, household chemicals, and how air pollutants become land and water pollutants.

9-12 Students investigate common beliefs about airborne toxics. The core activity provides information for understanding problems associated with airborne toxics and for constructing a continuum of beliefs about the seriousness of the problems. Students research and analyze information and to come to conclusions based upon their findings. Five connecting activities are belief statements about the severity of airborne toxics.

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