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Understanding Sacrifice Activities


found in: social studies; 6-8; 9-12

Understanding Sacrifice: Activities are a prolific set of resources spotlighting the efforts of men and women during WWII. Browse grade 6-12 cross-curricular activities or filter by grade range, theater of war, and subject. Each activity links to a biography of a military person who died in service. Standards are listed, extensions suggested, and assessment tools provided.

Feelings are Important: Recognizing the Range of Emotions in the Bataan Death March  Students in grades 6-8 assess the different emotions of soldiers by analyzing pictures, illustrations, and personal accounts of the Bataan Death March and defense of the Philippines.

Industry's Role in the Strategic Bombing Campaign  Students in grades 6-12 assess the strategic bombing campaign and contributions of wartime industries, such as the B-24 Willow Run bomber plant.

Congressional Debates Over the Women’s Army Corps  Students in grades 9-12 read the Congressional Record to understand why establishing a Women’s Army Corps was controversial and examine gender roles and women’s roles in the military.

Duty and Dignity: Black Americans and the 92nd Infantry Division Buffalo Soldiers  Students in grades 9-12 explore segregation during World War II and examine the contributions of the 92nd Infantry Division, one of only two African American divisions to serve in combat.

Saving Art during Wartime: A Monument Man’s Mission  Students in grades 9-12 examine and evaluate the activities of the Monuments, Fine Art, and Archives Commission.

The Bari Incident: Chemical Weapons and World War II  Students in grades 9-12 review the use of poison gas during World War I and learn about the sinking of the John Harvey at Bari, Italy that resulted in an unintentional release of mustard gas.

In addition, Primary Source Documents  are analyzed by a historian in six short videos. Women in the Workforce (7:12), for example,  looks at depictions of women in the workforce during WWII.

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