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NEA welcomes Gates Foundation moratorium on Common Core high-stakes tests

Van Roekel: School districts need time to get implementation of Common Core standards right

WASHINGTON - June 12, 2014 -

The Gates Foundation today called for a two-year moratorium on high-stakes consequences for Common Core exams. The National Education Association more than a year ago called for a course correction on Common Core.
NEA President Dennis Van Roekel issued the following statement.

“We are pleased that the Gates Foundation is joining the growing chorus of voices in calling for a two-year moratorium on using tests to make high-stakes decisions on teacher evaluations and student promotions. The more we all work together—educators, parents, students, and other key stakeholders—the sooner we can transform our education system to equip every student in America with the high-level skills needed for college and career success in our globally competitive environment.

“Educators continue to believe in the powerful potential of Common Core State Standards to help students develop the critical thinking and problem-solving skills they need to succeed in a dynamic economy and world. A rushed, under-resourced implementation of high standards will not benefit students or educators. Despite the challenges of properly implementing the Common Core State Standards, we simply cannot afford to allow a systemic flaw to jeopardize the future success of our students or our nation.

“School districts need time to get implementation of Common Core State Standards right and it is appropriate that we take the next two years to design systems that provide more time for students to learn and more time for educators to teach and collaborate. As we continue to move forward with commonsense implementation, it is essential that plans include the voices of students, parents, and educators.”

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The National Education Association is the nation's largest professional employee organization, representing more than 3 million elementary and secondary teachers, higher education faculty, education support professionals, school administrators, retired educators and students preparing to become teachers.


Miguel A. Gonzalez