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NEA Today January 2024 Cover
Magazine

NEA Today, January 2024

On Nov. 30, 2021, Michigan high school teacher Melissa Gibbons became part of a group she never wanted to join: school shooting survivors. Melissa shares her story in the latest issue of NEA Today, as we explore the complex issue of gun violence and meet educators who are making a difference in their schools. Together, we can change this.
NEA Today January 2024 Cover

Result List

Child in wheelchair working with a teacher at a desk
Feature Article

Differences, Not Deficits

by: Cindy Long January 5, 2024
We must focus on what students with disabilities can do, not what they can't.
creating equitable schools
Feature Article

Psst...Your Bias is Showing

by: Cindy Long December 4, 2023
Want to create more just schools? Three Idaho educators tell you exactly how to do it.
young girl in glasses sits and reads a picture book at library
Feature Article

The Joy of Reading Isn't Dead, Yet

by: Mary Ellen Flannery August 30, 2023
While the number of students who say they read for fun is at an all-time low, NEA members are turning the tide by providing access, choice, and maybe a dog in the library.

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Quote byGabby Harber , AP African American Studies student, Virginia

“You want to talk about the American Revolution? We were there. … You want to talk about the White House? I love the White House. We built it. Both times.”
—Gabby Harber , AP African American Studies student, Virginia

Editor's Note: The Power to Stop Gun Violence

Lockdown drills. Metal detectors. Bulletproof windows. Staff trainings on how to pack gunshot wounds. This is everyday life—not in a war zone, but in many of our nation’s schools.

Since 2021, there have been 159 shootings in our nation’s pre-K–12 schools and on college campuses that resulted in someone being injured or killed. These horrific incidents, memorialized on the cover of this magazine, include the mass shootings seared into the national consciousness—Robb Elementary School, in Uvalde, Texas; Michigan State University, in East Lansing; Morgan State University, in Baltimore; and too many others. They also include dozens of incidents of guns fired in schools, injuring or killing a classmate, an educator, someone’s sister, brother, son, daughter, mother, father, friend.

When we first designed this cover, we attempted to list every school shooting that has taken place since the massacre at Columbine High School, nearly 25 years ago. We even tried a fold-out cover that would triple its size. Still, the shootings wouldn’t fit.

Let that sink in. They wouldn’t fit.   

Then we tried to list school shootings from the last 10 years, 5 years—all too long.   

Every single one of these shootings is a tragedy. Every one shakes the community to its core. Every one is the reason school safety has climbed up the list of concerns for parents and educators in poll after poll.   

It’s easy to let the sheer magnitude of the problem lull us into passivity—into accepting that this is just the way it is. But we are not helpless. There is not one solution, but many that collectively will stanch the bloodshed and fear in our classrooms. And, as educators, we are uniquely positioned to make a real and lasting difference.

This month’s cover story, “We. Can. Change. This.” shows how we can channel our outrage and fear into real change. Together, we can raise our collective voice and mobilize our schools, our communities, our states, and our nation. We. Can. Change. This.

—Anitrá Speight, Associate Publisher and Director

Find more NEA Today Stories

October 2023 NEA Today Cover

NEA Today, October 2023

In our October issue of NEA Today, we have educators' and students' backs, from shining a light on the mental health crisis in our rural communities, to keeping educators safe from physical harm in the classroom, to advocating for students with disabilities, and more. Learn how educators are making math more relevant, why we can't judge schools based on rankings, and how education support professionals are getting free of student loan debt.
NEA Today Retired, January 2024

NEA Today Retired, January 2024

Does your fitness routine need a makeover this year? Find your workout inspiration in this issue and meet retired educators who are taking a stand against systemic racism.
2023 NEA Today - Aspiring Educators cover

NEA Today for Aspiring Educators, 2023

In this issue, learn how Aspiring Educators across the country are working with their union to preserve democracy and prevent further setbacks, organizing to end unpaid student teaching placements, and growing union membership on campus chapters. Plus, find practical advice on how to go from student life to the professional world!
NEA Today January 2024 Cover

NEA Today, January 2024

On Nov. 30, 2021, Michigan high school teacher Melissa Gibbons became part of a group she never wanted to join: school shooting survivors. Melissa shares her story in the latest issue of NEA Today, as we explore the complex issue of gun violence and meet educators who are making a difference in their schools. Together, we can change this.
Download the Issue (pdf)

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National Education Association

Great public schools for every student

The National Education Association (NEA), the nation's largest professional employee organization, is committed to advancing the cause of public education. NEA's 3 million members work at every level of education—from pre-school to university graduate programs. NEA has affiliate organizations in every state and in more than 14,000 communities across the United States.